Fundamental frequencies in a violin string.

In summary, the lowest frequency heard is when the violinist bows the string at a distance L/4 from one end and touches the string lightly at the midpoint.
  • #1
LCSphysicist
646
161
Homework Statement
A violin string on a violin is of length L and can be considered to be
fastened at both ends. The fundamental of the open string has a frequency
fo. The violinist bows the string at a distance L/4 from one end and touches
the string lightly at the midpoint.
"Under this condition, what is the lowest frequency he can excite?"
Relevant Equations
All below
Why is this wrong?:
1595444781626.png


That is, why is not f = 4fo?
Oh. And my figure 1 can be wrong, because maybe i got confused if the string was open or closed in the boundaries, anyway this change nothing the relations (1)
 
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  • #2
LCSphysicist said:
Homework Statement:: A violin string on a violin is of length L and can be considered to be
fastened at both ends.
The fundamental of the open string has a frequency
fo. The violinist bows the string at a distance L/4 from one end and touches
the string lightly at the midpoint.

"Under this condition, what is the lowest frequency he can excite?"
Relevant Equations:: All below

Why is this wrong?:
View attachment 266711

That is, why is not f = 4fo?
Oh. And my figure 1 can be wrong, because maybe i got confused if the string was open or closed in the boundaries, anyway this change nothing the relations (1)
The string is fastened at both ends.
The violinist bows the string at a distance L/4 from one end and touches
the string lightly at the midpoint.

Where are the nodes and antinodes of the string? What is the wavelength then?
 
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Likes LCSphysicist
  • #3
ehild said:
The string is fastened at both ends.
The violinist bows the string at a distance L/4 from one end and touches
the string lightly at the midpoint.

Where are the nodes and antinodes of the string? What is the wavelength then?
Maybe...
The antinodes is where the violinist touch, and the nodes are just the points which he is holding and the another normal point which was stuck from the beginning.
L/4 = λ/4
L = λ.
This solve the problems.
 
  • #4
LCSphysicist said:
Maybe...
The antinodes is where the violinist touch, and the nodes are just the points which he is holding and the another normal point which was stuck from the beginning.
L/4 = λ/4
L = λ.
This solve the problems.
yes, so the lowest frequency heard is?
 

Related to Fundamental frequencies in a violin string.

1. What is a fundamental frequency in a violin string?

A fundamental frequency in a violin string is the lowest frequency at which the string can vibrate. It is also known as the first harmonic and determines the pitch of the note produced.

2. How is the fundamental frequency of a violin string determined?

The fundamental frequency of a violin string is determined by its length, tension, and mass. The shorter the string, the higher the frequency, while the higher the tension and lower the mass, the higher the frequency.

3. Why is the fundamental frequency important in a violin string?

The fundamental frequency is important because it is the basis for all other frequencies produced by the string. It determines the pitch of the note and is essential for creating different tones and melodies on the violin.

4. Can the fundamental frequency of a violin string be changed?

Yes, the fundamental frequency of a violin string can be changed by altering its length, tension, or mass. This can be done by adjusting the tuning pegs, using a capo, or changing the thickness of the string.

5. How does the fundamental frequency of a violin string affect the sound produced?

The fundamental frequency of a violin string affects the sound produced by determining the pitch of the note. A higher fundamental frequency will produce a higher-pitched sound, while a lower fundamental frequency will produce a lower-pitched sound.

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