Girl Climbing Rope: Avg Speed & Work Calculated

  • Thread starter Grey_117
  • Start date
  • Tags
    Girl Rope
In summary, the conversation is about a student who weighs 55.0 kg climbing a 4.00 m long rope and stopping at the top. The first question asks for the average speed needed to match the power output of a 200-W lightbulb, while the second question asks for the amount of work done. The relevant equations discussed are P = W/time total and 1/2Mvf^2-1/2mvi^2.
  • #1
Grey_117
1
0

Homework Statement



A 55.0 kg student climbs a 4.00 m long rope and stops at the top.
(a) What must her average speed be in order to match the power output of a 200-W lightbulb?
(M/S)

(b) How much work does she do?
(J)


Homework Equations



Well if i had to guess...they might be

P=W/time total

1/2Mvf^2-1/2mvi^2


The Attempt at a Solution

 
Last edited:
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
It's OK to be unsure of the relevant equations but not OK when you only give the question. The forum is here to help you, not to do your homework for you.

So don't be shy; which equations do you even half-suspect may be relevant?
 
  • #3


I would approach this problem by first converting the given information into SI units. The student's mass of 55.0 kg and the length of the rope of 4.00 m can be used to calculate the gravitational potential energy using the formula U=mgh, where g is the acceleration due to gravity (9.8 m/s^2). This gives us a value of 2156 J for the potential energy.

(a) To match the power output of a 200-W lightbulb, the student's average speed must be equal to the power output divided by the potential energy. This gives us an average speed of 0.093 m/s.

(b) The work done by the student can be calculated using the formula W=F*d, where F is the force applied and d is the distance moved. In this case, the force applied is equal to the weight of the student, which can be calculated using the formula F=mg. This gives us a force of 539 N. Multiplying this by the distance of 4.00 m, we get a work done of 2156 J, which is equal to the potential energy.

In conclusion, the student's average speed must be 0.093 m/s and the work done is 2156 J to match the power output of a 200-W lightbulb. It is important for scientists to use correct units and formulas in their calculations to ensure accurate results.
 

Related to Girl Climbing Rope: Avg Speed & Work Calculated

1. What is the average speed of a girl climbing a rope?

The average speed of a girl climbing a rope varies depending on factors such as the length of the rope, the difficulty of the climb, and the physical ability of the individual. However, on average, a skilled climber can ascend a rope at a speed of 5-7 feet per minute.

2. How is average speed calculated for a girl climbing a rope?

The average speed for a girl climbing a rope is calculated by dividing the total distance climbed by the total time taken. For example, if a girl climbs a 20-foot rope in 4 minutes, her average speed would be 20 feet/4 minutes = 5 feet per minute.

3. What is the work involved in climbing a rope?

The work involved in climbing a rope is the product of the force applied and the distance climbed. In other words, it is the energy required to overcome the force of gravity and move the body up the rope. This work is typically measured in joules or calories.

4. How is work calculated for a girl climbing a rope?

Work is calculated by multiplying the force applied by the distance climbed. For example, if a girl weighing 50kg climbs a 20-foot rope, the work involved would be 50kg x 20 feet = 1000 joules.

5. Can a girl's average speed and work while climbing a rope be improved?

Yes, a girl's average speed and work while climbing a rope can be improved through regular practice and training. By building strength, endurance, and technique, a girl can increase her speed and efficiency while climbing a rope.

Similar threads

  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
6
Views
1K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
12
Views
2K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
3
Views
1K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
11
Views
2K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
5
Views
2K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
14
Views
7K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
5
Views
2K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
2
Views
310
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
7
Views
4K
Replies
2
Views
944
Back
Top