Going back to school for engineering at 25?

In summary, the author is considering going back to school and wants feedback on whether or not it's a good idea. They graduated with a degree in economics but feel like they want more out of their life and are interested in math and science. They are worried about the money and if it would be an issue to go back to school. They also have a music degree and went back to school for physics. They were able to pay off their undergraduate debt and are hoping that it won't be an issue to go back to school for engineering.
  • #1
I'm really considering going back to school for engineering and could use some advice.

I'm currently 25 years old, and graduated a couple years ago with a degree in economics. Since then I've been working (unrelated to my degree), and just feel like I want something more. I was always intrigued by math and science. I chose economics because I figured I'm "OK" in math, but not good enough to go through with the required math for engineering and science degrees. I'm not bad at math (not great either), but it was more laziness that held me back.

Since graduating I've thought about going back for engineering, but I keep talking myself out of it. The main thing that is holding me back is money. I don't have much saved up now, and I still have $30k of debt from undergrad. If I went back to school it would hopefully be at a state school (Rutgers most likely).

I don't regret my coursework in economics. I enjoyed it while I did it. The career prospects were less than stellar though, and I'm more intrigued by science than by finance and economics. Also, I like the idea of engineers actually contributing something to society... is that a jaded view? Is it a case of "the grass is greener?"

Overall, I think I'm finally done talking myself out of it and would like to make the leap. Any opinions would truly be helpful.
 
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  • #2
I did--after having completed a degree in Cognitive Behavioural Neuroscience.

I was 26 (27 now).
 
  • #3
if money is an issue, do 1-2 years at a community college. depending on which type of engineering you want to do, most schools offer:

calc-physics 1-2, chem 1-2, calc 1-2 (3, diffeq, linear algebra)

^ core engineering

and if you want to do bioe or cheme: bio 1-2 or organic chem 1-2 (cause of nursing programs)

this should save you plenty of money over a state school, and if you do well in classes, idk if you could transfer in with some type of scholarship. my community college has an honors program and stuff.
 
  • #4
I have a music degree. Went back to school a little over a year ago for physics. I started at a community college, saved a ton of money. I was 27 when I started back to school, fortunately I had long since paid my first undergrad debt. 25 is certainly not too old.
 
  • #5
If you don't do it now, when will you? Good luck! :smile:
 
  • #6
ZenOne said:
I did--after having completed a degree in Cognitive Behavioural Neuroscience.

I was 26 (27 now).

I'm sure you needed a good amount of math and science for your first degree though? Why did you decide to go back? How do you like it so far?

Highway said:
if money is an issue, do 1-2 years at a community college. depending on which type of engineering you want to do, most schools offer:

calc-physics 1-2, chem 1-2, calc 1-2 (3, diffeq, linear algebra)

^ core engineering

and if you want to do bioe or cheme: bio 1-2 or organic chem 1-2 (cause of nursing programs)

this should save you plenty of money over a state school, and if you do well in classes, idk if you could transfer in with some type of scholarship. my community college has an honors program and stuff.

I thought about this. The only thing I'm worried about is the stigma that surrounds community college. Since it's just core classes, I hope it wouldn't be too much of an issue. I definitely am trying to save as much money as I can though.

QuarkCharmer said:
I have a music degree. Went back to school a little over a year ago for physics. I started at a community college, saved a ton of money. I was 27 when I started back to school, fortunately I had long since paid my first undergrad debt. 25 is certainly not too old.

You're lucky that you were able to take care of your debt. Did you have any issues with starting at a community college? Obviously I want to be able to get into the best (and cheapest) possible school I can after my core classes... I'm just wondering if that'll be an issue.

dacruick said:
If you don't do it now, when will you? Good luck! :smile:

That's what I'm sayin! I always seem to come back to this route and say, "this is what I should be doing." So I might as well try. I don't want to put this off again, and 5 years from now regret not taking the chance.
 

1. What are the benefits of going back to school for engineering at 25?

There are several benefits to going back to school for engineering at 25. First, you have more life experience and maturity, which can help you better understand and apply complex engineering concepts. Additionally, you may have a clearer idea of what you want to specialize in, making it easier to choose a specific engineering program. Finally, going back to school at 25 can open up new career opportunities and potentially increase your earning potential.

2. Is it too late to pursue a career in engineering at 25?

No, it is not too late to pursue a career in engineering at 25. Many successful engineers have started their engineering education later in life. As long as you are dedicated and willing to put in the work, age should not be a barrier to pursuing your passion for engineering.

3. How long will it take to complete an engineering degree at 25?

The length of time it takes to complete an engineering degree at 25 will depend on the specific program and your course load. Generally, a bachelor's degree in engineering can take 4-5 years to complete. However, if you have transferable credits or choose to take summer classes, you may be able to finish in a shorter amount of time.

4. Can I still work while going back to school for engineering at 25?

Yes, it is possible to work while going back to school for engineering at 25. Many engineering programs offer flexible class schedules, including evening and online classes, to accommodate working students. However, it is important to carefully balance your work and school commitments to ensure you are able to succeed in both areas.

5. Are there any scholarships or financial aid options available for older students going back to school for engineering?

Yes, there are scholarship and financial aid options available for older students going back to school for engineering. Many universities and organizations offer scholarships specifically for non-traditional or adult students. Additionally, you may be eligible for federal financial aid, such as grants and loans, to help cover the cost of your education. It is important to research and apply for these opportunities early to increase your chances of receiving aid.

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