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Graduate programs in Complex Systems?

  1. Sep 18, 2007 #1
    Hi, I am interested in Chaos, Complex Systems and Nonlinear dynamics systems and Statistical physics, can anyone please suggest me some graduate programs in this topics and maybe some literature too?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Sep 18, 2007 #2

    Chris Hillman

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    Some obvious possibilities include Stony Brook, University of Maryland (College Park), University of New Mexico (with an eye to Sante Fe Insitute). If you haven't read the two volume book by E. Atlee Jackson, Perspectives on Nonlinear Dynamics, you should run right out and buy this book.
     
  4. Sep 19, 2007 #3
    You might want to look at groups doing research on granular materials - people are also doing some cool stat mech on glassy systems.

    What geographic area are you looking in?
     
  5. Sep 19, 2007 #4
    Right now I am in Mexico, I was looking in Mexico and USA, but I am not closed only to this 2 options.

    I have one more question, is hard to find a job in this topics?
     
  6. Sep 19, 2007 #5
    Cornell has a really good Applied Mathematics department, alongwith University of Maryland. Stony Brook has a much more pure dynamical systems department; not really focusing on the applications and really more on just the pure theory.
     
  7. Sep 19, 2007 #6
    Not many schools have a strong dynamics department or have a desire to hire such a researcher to be honest. You can count on your hand the number of schools that have more than 7 faculty members who specifically study dynamics. It might be tough, but do what you love.
     
  8. Sep 21, 2007 #7

    J77

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    I'd rate Guckenheimer's Cornell group right up there.

    Check out Kevrekidis in Princeton for some interesting Chem. Eng. stuff.

    Koppell in Boston (BU) for bio stuff.

    Ermentrout in Pittsburgh for neuro things.
     
  9. Sep 21, 2007 #8

    J77

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    Is this just from your personal experience?

    Check out a conference site like: http://siam.org/meetings/ds07/ to see that's not true.
     
  10. Sep 21, 2007 #9
    Steven Strogatz (my nonlinear dynamics and chaos text author) is on the dyn systems advisory board. why not look into cornell?
     
  11. Sep 24, 2007 #10

    J77

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  12. Sep 24, 2007 #11

    Chris Hillman

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    Maryland is strong in both pure and applied dynamical systems. So, two votes for UM and Stony Brook, actually for Cornell too (I am a Cornell alum :wink: but did my undergrad degree in pure math).
     
  13. Sep 24, 2007 #12

    Chris Hillman

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    rdgarza, I'd disregard this particular comment by InbredDummy, since few math departments have seven faculty members which work on any one topic (in fact, I'd be a bit worried about any department which was that specialized). In a large department with 50 full-time faculty, you might have three to five who work in the same area and in that case this would be a significant strength of that department. But it seems ID and I agree that University of Maryland at College Park (that's a Metro ride from Washington, DC and the Smithsonian complex if you're interested), State University of New York at Stony Brook, and Cornell would all be good choices.
     
    Last edited: Sep 24, 2007
  14. Sep 24, 2007 #13
    Hi people!

    Thanks all of you for your posts.

    I know these topics have a lot of applications, so maybe is not a big problem to get a job related to Chaos, Complex Systems and Nonlinear dynamics systems and Statistical physics.

    Definitively Maryland is a strong option in all this topics, but, can you tell me something about institution outside USA?, I know the UNAM in Mexico have a Complex Systems Department (http://scifunam.fisica.unam.mx/), do anyone know something about it?
     
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