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Other Graduate School for a non-Physics (Econ and Math) major

  1. Mar 10, 2016 #1
    Hi everyone,

    I'm currently a third year Economics major hoping to switch to the Economics and Mathematics by the end of this year. Considering I should have been a Physics major in the first place, I have started taking Physics course starting from my third year in an attempt to eventually go to graduate school in Physics. I'm listing the Math and Physics that I have taken or hope to take by the time I graduate.

    Mathematics:

    Calculus I (A); Calculus II (A-); Linear Algebra (A); Probability (A); Analysis I (A+); Analysis II (A+); Topology (A). I have done these.

    In case I'm able to switch my major, I'll be able to squeeze in a one or two more classes (perhaps a course on Calculus on Manifolds, Algebra etc.)

    Physics:

    I have done Mechanics (A+) and QM (B). I'm taking Condensed Matter Physics, QM II and Advanced QM this term. In case my major gets changed, I can go all Physics in my senior year and take 8 courses or 7 courses + senior year project. The courses will be the usual culprits:

    E&M, Waves and Optics, SR, GR, Classical Mechanics etc. Perhaps one or two advanced courses. Particle Physics etc.

    Given my trajectory up till my senior year, what would be the best way to go to graduate school in Physics? Should I try a second bachelor's? Am I preparing myself enough to go to graduate school in Physics? There are a lot of threads on this forum from people with similar cases, but I'd appreciate if you could advise me based on my trajectory since I am trying to become as Physics oriented as possible during my last 2-3 semesters.

    P.S: I'm from a university in Lahore, Pakistan.

    I'd really like your input on this!
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Mar 12, 2016 #2

    Student100

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    Why not just change your major to physics? That's generally the best way to get accepted into a physics graduate program. I don't know specifically about your country though.
     
  4. Mar 12, 2016 #3

    Vanadium 50

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    The quality of education in Pakistan is among the worst in the world. The best advice I can give you is to transfer out of country.
     
  5. Mar 16, 2016 #4

    StatGuy2000

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    Vanadium 50, what is your source for the assertion you make above about the quality of post-secondary education in Pakistan?
     
  6. Mar 16, 2016 #5

    Vanadium 50

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    You can look at rankings, of course, but you can also look at the curriculum, or commentary in the press, or (and this is what sways me the most) the quantity and quality of graduate students compared to, say, India. Pakistan is 10% of the size of India. They do not have a commensurate representation among physics graduate students, and they certainly don't have the same level of background. The ones I have met have largely barely been hanging on.
     
  7. Mar 16, 2016 #6
    hmm is it really that bad? many pakistani students from the good universities go on to do their masters in good unis in europe and UK (even the top universities). But this is mainly for engineering courses that I think. I don't know about physics.
     
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