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Engineering Guidance as a nuclear physicist after B.Tech in Mechanical Engineering

  1. May 9, 2016 #1
    Can anyone please provide me information about the career as a nuclear physicists after B.Tech in Mechanical Engineering. is it a viable option?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. May 9, 2016 #2

    ZapperZ

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    Clarification: Are you asking whether you can go DIRECTLY into a career as a "nuclear physicist" (do you even know what that is?) with that degree and without seeking further education?

    Zz.
     
  4. May 9, 2016 #3
    I was interested in doing masters degree in that arena. Or even PhD if possible
     
  5. May 9, 2016 #4

    ZapperZ

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    Next question: Where do you intend to pursue this "masters" and "PhD" degree?

    Next, next question: What kind of a physics background did you get with your undergraduate degree?

    Zz.
     
  6. May 9, 2016 #5
    If possible in IISE BANGALORE, OR IIT KANPUR, OR SAHA INSTITUTE OF NUCLEAR PHYSICS. I did B.Tech in Mechanical Engineering. Is it even possible to switch to physics stream.
     
  7. May 10, 2016 #6

    DrSteve

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    Anything is possible, it's just some things are more probable than others. Have you talked to any of the faculty at your school?
     
  8. May 10, 2016 #7
    Yes, I talked with my HOD. He said it is good to prefer conventional field like Thermal or design etc. But I am more inclined towards the high energy physics. See, I don't want to enter a field where my present studies will not be sufficient for studies in that area. And be a failure after joining. So I need to be sure before joining.
     
  9. May 10, 2016 #8

    ZapperZ

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    Wait... do you want to do nuclear physics, or do you want to do high energy physics? Read the title of your thread again.

    Zz.
     
  10. May 10, 2016 #9
    H
    I, may be wrong but I think these things are nearly same.
    Nuclear physics deals with nucleus and it's constituents and
    HEP deals with sub atomic particles like bosoms, quarks, etc
    HEP deals with a scale smaller than nuclear physics.
    But if they are different then I will go with HEP
     
  11. May 10, 2016 #10

    e.bar.goum

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    They are definitely different. A generally good idea is to know what a field is, before you even consider doing a PhD in it.
     
  12. May 11, 2016 #11
    Thank you for your guidance..
     
  13. May 11, 2016 #12

    DrSteve

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    To round out the topic, you cannot directly go from a B.S. in Mechanical Engineering to enter into either a nuclear physics or particle physics PhD. You do not have the proper training. You could acquire it, but it would it take a year or two of diligent study.
     
  14. May 11, 2016 #13
    Th
    Thank you sir
     
  15. May 11, 2016 #14

    Vanadium 50

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    I think those are something different.
     
  16. May 11, 2016 #15
    Sorry typing mistake..
     
  17. May 11, 2016 #16

    MathematicalPhysicist

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    :-D
     
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