Guidance on Postgraduate Engineering pathways

In summary, there are postgraduate engineering fields that involve both working with the industry and in theoretical areas, such as the engineering doctorate program in the UK. However, these opportunities may vary depending on the country and it is recommended to contact the post-graduate admissions officer at desired departments to inquire about industry connections and potential sponsored projects. Some companies also have research and development departments that focus on more theoretical work.
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Are there any postgraduate engineering fields that involve working both with the industry and working in theoretical (physics, math) stuff? I'm thinking about (research) master's or PhD here.

It seems that all engineering subfields are either purely academic or purely industry with no middle ground. Maybe that's just the way it looks to me.
 
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  • #2
Which country are you in?

Certainly here in the UK, yes, it does happen. I would probably take exception with your use of 'theoretical', but these days most people seem to make an incorrect decision about what defines theory and that which defines experiment. Anyway, situations in which a partial industry/academic environment arises will be, for instance, where some industrial organisation is paying an academic department to have some work done, or is sponsoring a research student (with a view to increasing the profile of the organisation within the graduate level community for future employees) etc.

The way to go about finding an opportunity such as this would be to contact the post-graduate admissions officer at departments you would be interested working in. Explain your interests in the research area, and, when appropriate, enquire about the industry connections the department has. You would then be able to ask if there are any sponsored projects or that which is done partially in an industrial setting. There may also be other things to consider, if you're interested in biomedical engineering for example, then there would be clinical work to consider as well.

Finally, here in the UK (I'm not sure about other countries) we have a non-PhD doctorate programme, an engineering doctorate - known as an EngD. Oftentimes these are more industry orientated (though they are based/set up at academic institutions) in that the student will often work in collaboration with an industry or learn about the development of a final product in business terms.
 
  • #3
IttyBittyBit said:
It seems that all engineering subfields are either purely academic or purely industry with no middle ground. Maybe that's just the way it looks to me.

Some of the corporate research labs at Microsoft work on some pretty esoteric stuff, and from what I've seen other companies R&D departments also tend to have at least one or two groups who are on the more theory side of things.
 

1. What is the purpose of "Guidance on Postgraduate Engineering pathways"?

The purpose of "Guidance on Postgraduate Engineering pathways" is to provide information and advice to individuals interested in pursuing postgraduate studies in the field of engineering. It aims to help students make informed decisions about their education and career paths.

2. Who can benefit from this guidance?

This guidance can benefit anyone who is considering pursuing a postgraduate degree in engineering, whether they are currently undergraduate students, recent graduates, or professionals seeking to further their education and career.

3. What topics are covered in this guidance?

This guidance covers a wide range of topics including the different types of postgraduate engineering degrees available, the application process, funding options, career prospects, and tips for success in postgraduate studies.

4. Is this guidance specific to a particular country or region?

No, this guidance is not specific to any particular country or region. It provides general information and advice that is applicable to anyone interested in pursuing postgraduate engineering studies in any part of the world.

5. How can I access this guidance?

This guidance can be accessed through various sources such as university websites, educational blogs, and online forums. It is also available in the form of printed materials from career and academic advisors at universities and colleges.

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