Guide to Writing a Physics Paper: Templates, Structure and Tips

In summary, the conversation discusses the possibility of a layman writing a physics paper and getting published in a peer-reviewed journal. It is mentioned that the chances of this happening are very low, even for experienced researchers. The person asking the question shares their interest in writing about gravity, time, and mass, but acknowledges that they lack formal education in the subject. The other person advises caution and recommends reading an article on the dangers of "quack" theories. The conversation ends with the acknowledgement that this is a common dream, but it may not lead to success.
  • #1
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I would like to write a physics paper but was at a loss as to the general structure of one.
Can you guys point me in the direction of some templates, or papers that would act as good templates?
Also what are the chances of a layman getting published or even entertained by peer reviewed journals?
 
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  • #2
  • #3
The chances of a layman getting published are marginally above if not zero. Its hard enough to to get any paper published even with a great reputation, lots of previous papers and years of research.

Dont let that stop you though. You want to do it, go for it!

What area are you thinking of writing about?
 
  • #4
xxChrisxx said:
The chances of a layman getting published are marginally above if not zero. Its hard enough to to get any paper published even with a great reputation, lots of previous papers and years of research.

Dont let that stop you though. You want to do it, go for it!

What area are you thinking of writing about?

I have a theory of everything to give it its popular dramatic title, but more specifically gravity, time and mass. I know my kook rating just shot up, but just because I was unable to go to Uni dosen't mean I can't be right. I understand I am literally barking at the moon, but it is a safe hobby and dream to have. It beats gambling and drug taking hands down.
What do you suggest as a more realistic audience for any paper I may produce?
 
  • #5
chis said:
I have a theory of everything to give it its popular dramatic title, but more specifically gravity, time and mass. I know my kook rating just shot up, but just because I was unable to go to Uni dosen't mean I can't be right. I understand I am literally barking at the moon, but it is a safe hobby and dream to have. It beats gambling and drug taking hands down.
What do you suggest as a more realistic audience for any paper I may produce?

I have a very obvious question: How are you to know that what you have is worthy of consideration when you do not have the full faculty of the subject area that you think you're working in? The fact that you don't even know about physics journals should already cause you great concern, because it implies that you are ignorant of advances and knowledge in that field of study, much less if what you are doing is already well-known or proven to be false.

While it is fine to "dream", imagination without knowledge is ignorance waiting to happen. You may have wasted a lot of time for nothing.

Before you proceed, you may want to read this:

http://insti.physics.sunysb.edu/~siegel/quack.html

It isn't meant to discourage. It is only to show you that you are not the first, nor shall you be the last, to have this kind of "ambition". Unfortunately for many of us here, we have seen all this before, and there's nothing to indicate that this will end any differently.

Zz.
 
  • #6
Yes you are spot on and I agree it is a popular pipe dream and I am just another pipe wielding nut. I do like the challenge and will carry on learning and enjoying the process.
 

1. What is the purpose of a physics paper?

The purpose of a physics paper is to communicate scientific findings and ideas in a clear and organized manner. It allows researchers to share their work with the scientific community and contribute to the advancement of knowledge in the field of physics.

2. What should be included in a physics paper?

A physics paper should include a title, abstract, introduction, methodology, results, discussion, and conclusion. It should also have references to any sources used in the research and any necessary figures or tables to support the findings.

3. What is the recommended structure for a physics paper?

The recommended structure for a physics paper is to start with an introduction that provides background information and states the research question. This should be followed by a methodology section that explains the experimental or theoretical methods used. The results section should present the findings in a clear and organized manner, and the discussion section should interpret and analyze the results. The paper should end with a conclusion that summarizes the main points and their implications.

4. Are there any templates available for writing a physics paper?

Yes, there are many templates available online that can help with the formatting and structure of a physics paper. These templates can be customized to fit the specific requirements of a particular journal or publication.

5. What are some tips for writing a successful physics paper?

Some tips for writing a successful physics paper include clearly defining the research question, using concise and precise language, providing sufficient evidence to support the findings, and following the guidelines and formatting requirements of the target journal or publication. It is also important to proofread the paper carefully and have it reviewed by colleagues or mentors before submission.

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