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Has anyone ever done this experiment before? quantum entanglement

  1. May 26, 2015 #1
    enangle 2 electrons. Capture 1 electron by using this method http://news.discovery.com/tech/photo-first-lights-captured-as-both-particle-and-wave-150302.htm. Send an electron from earth to the moon. Have an detector on the moon that measure a property of entanglement and same with on earth. View the entangled particle first on earth. Repeat the experiment view the other detector first would this change the results? Has anyone ever done this before? ( my point is the past can affect the future similar to viewing the sun from a telescope.) Or am i wrong and this is what entanglement is and just proves entanglement is weird?
     
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  3. May 26, 2015 #2

    e.bar.goum

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    Among other issues with this idea, you really can't do that. Interactions with the environment (scattering) would quickly take your electron out of the pure state.

    Also, this wouldn't show anything other experiments haven't done before.
     
    Last edited: May 26, 2015
  4. May 26, 2015 #3
    Nobody will do an entanglement experiment sending something to the moon. You can do the same experiment here on Earth, in a lab, sending a particle to the other side of the lab table and test the same physics.
     
  5. May 26, 2015 #4
  6. May 26, 2015 #5

    ZapperZ

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    But this is an experiment using entangled photons, not the electrons that is in the OP. There is a reason why closing the locality loophole for electrons is more difficult than with photons. Electrons are easily affected by stray fields, and maintaining coherence from here to the moon is practically impossible.

    Zz.
     
  7. May 27, 2015 #6
    Do a similar experiment with photons. Use a telescope and capture 1 of the photon assuming possible. View the photon 1 light minute away then quickly view the photon right beside the experiment. This takes 1 minute for the signal to go back to the original photon. Would this not prove ftl or something even stranger?

    Or is this already been proven with quantum entanglement?

    How was quantum entanglement proven?
     
  8. May 27, 2015 #7

    e.bar.goum

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    There's no reason you have to do that. You can do this experiment just as well going from one side of a lab to another. The speed of light isn't that fast in the scheme of the kind of time intervals that can be measured if you're clever.

    I'm still not sure what you're trying to show here, and I'm not sure what you mean by "proven" in this context. Entanglement is something that has been measured countless times in labs. You can even buy kits off-the-shelf for undergraduate physics labs. http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/observations/do-it-yourself-quantum-spooky-action/[/PLAIN] [Broken]

    ETA: You should read this http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bell_test_experiments
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 7, 2017
  9. May 27, 2015 #8

    ZapperZ

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    You seem to be ignoring the responses given to you. There are ALREADY experiments with photons that showed the non-locality of this phenomenon. These were done over several kilometers.

    So to repeat what e.bar.goum had asked you, what exactly are you trying to measure and show here? What would the extra long distance show that previous experiments can't or hadn't? No one is going to do any experiments when there is no or very little knowledge can be gained from it when compared to previously-done experiments. You haven't shown why experiments that had been done already can't already address the same thing.

    Try not to ignore this question. Otherwise, your "experiment" has no merit.

    Zz.
     
  10. May 27, 2015 #9
    Oh darn! Thanks for pointing that out -- I must have had a brain fade when I forgot the OP was talking about electrons rather than photons.
     
  11. May 27, 2015 #10

    ZapperZ

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    It doesn't matter now, because the OP has switched to photons. Sometime in threads like this, I feel as if things are being made up as we go along.

    Zz.
     
  12. May 27, 2015 #11

    phinds

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    Yes, but you only feel that way because it's true.
     
  13. May 27, 2015 #12
    Sorry should have read more carefully.
    Thanks for the responses.
     
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