Heat question -- Ice cube in a cup of water...

  • Thread starter zanyzoya
  • Start date
  • #1
zanyzoya
Gold Member
14
0

Homework Statement


An ice cube of mass 0.01.kg at a temperature of 0 degrees Celsius is dropped into a cup containing 0.10kg of water at a temperature of 15 degrees Celsius. What is the max estimated change in temperature of the contents of the cup?
SHC of water = 4200J per kg per kelvin
latent heat of fusion of ice = 340000 J per kg

Homework Equations

and attempt at a solution[/B]

heat lost by water = heat gained by ice
mwaterC ΔTwater = mice C ΔTice + mΔL

0.1 x 4200 x ΔTwater = 0.01 x 4200 ΔTice + 0.01 x 340000

420(Tfinal-15) = 42 (Tfinal-0) + 3400
420T - 6300 = 42T + 3400
T= 25 degrees
so change in temperature = 15-25 = -10 degrees celcius
This is wrong as the actual answer is 8.7 K
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
DrClaude
Mentor
7,627
4,068
T= 25 degrees
So the final temperature is higher than all initial temperatures? Doesn't make sense, right?

heat lost by water = heat gained by ice
mwaterC ΔTwater = mice C ΔTice + mΔL
First problem: the left-hand side here doesn't correspond to "heat loss by water."

420(Tfinal-15) = 42 (Tfinal-0) + 3400
Second problem: you have to use absolute temperatures here.
 
  • #3
zanyzoya
Gold Member
14
0
Thanks Dr Claude
Re your first point, my understanding is as follows:
As the water cools down it will loose heat equal to mc delta T, also heat will by lost to surroundings and to the cup. Some of this heat which is lost by the water is given to the ice to initially cause a change in state and finally raise its temperature. Am I on the wrong lines here?

I've converted the values to kelvin and I still get the same answer?!?
 
  • #4
DrClaude
Mentor
7,627
4,068
As the water cools down it will loose heat equal to mc delta T, also heat will by lost to surroundings and to the cup. Some of this heat which is lost by the water is given to the ice to initially cause a change in state and finally raise its temperature. Am I on the wrong lines here?
Your approach is correct, but you have to be careful about the signs. (This is a general comment: when you get a final temperature that is higher than the initial temperature, while it should be the other way around, the first thing to check are the signs.)
 
  • #5
gneill
Mentor
20,936
2,877
... the actual answer is 8.7 K
That value looks a little high to me. Just melting the ice (ice@0C → water@0C) should take enough heat from the existing liquid water to drop its temperature below that value.
 
  • #6
2,051
317
That value looks a little high to me. Just melting the ice (ice@0C → water@0C) should take enough heat from the existing liquid water to drop its temperature below that value.
Not that the 8.7K that was asked, is the temperature change and not the final temperature, wich is 6.3C.
 
  • #7
gneill
Mentor
20,936
2,877
Not that the 8.7K that was asked, is the temperature change and not the final temperature, wich is 6.3C.
Ah. My mistake. I should really pay closer attention to these small details. Thanks :smile:
 
  • #8
haruspex
Science Advisor
Homework Helper
Insights Author
Gold Member
2020 Award
37,155
7,275
heat gained by ice
42 (Tfinal-0)
So far so good: heat gained is proportional to the final temperature minus the initial temperature.
So for heat lost,
heat lost by water
how should you calculate the temperature difference? Not like this:
420(Tfinal-15)
 

Related Threads on Heat question -- Ice cube in a cup of water...

  • Last Post
Replies
3
Views
16K
  • Last Post
Replies
5
Views
5K
Replies
1
Views
7K
Replies
4
Views
9K
Replies
1
Views
2K
  • Last Post
Replies
4
Views
7K
  • Last Post
Replies
1
Views
2K
Top