Heat treat 800H steel to 1600F -- any contractors that can do this?

  • Thread starter Rob Inks
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In summary, a 40' tall 126" ID reactor has weld cracks that need to be preheated and post-treated. The contractor will need to be experienced in pressure vessel repairs and the weld zone will need to beglowed an orange-reddish color when tested. It's not clear where the reactor is welded, or if the weld cracks are located such that the entire reactor needs preheating. The fabricator may be able to help find a contractor. A brief request for quotation can be sent out.
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Rob Inks
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I have a 40' tall 126" ID reactor that has some weld cracks. I need to pre heat this vessel to roughly 1600 F to drive impurities out of the grain before welding and also needs to be post treated. Has anyone ever done something similar on this large of a scale? I need to find a contractor capable of such a job.
 
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Rob Inks said:
I have a 40' tall 126" ID reactor that has some weld cracks. I need to pre heat this vessel to roughly 1600 F to drive impurities out of the grain before welding and also needs to be post treated. Has anyone ever done something similar on this large of a scale? I need to find a contractor capable of such a job.

You should at least do a search for companies experienced in pressure vessel repairs.

Try some of the companies at this link:

http://www.thomasnet.com/products/pressure-vessel-repair-services-91722207-1.html
 
  • #3
Thanks for your help. I have used contractors in the past but they are not capable of such an enormous project. I know that we can't be the first company to need to do a vessel this big. Just throwing feelers out there to see if maybe anyone had been involved in a similar project.
 
  • #4
Rob Inks said:
Thanks for your help. I have used contractors in the past but they are not capable of such an enormous project. I know that we can't be the first company to need to do a vessel this big. Just throwing feelers out there to see if maybe anyone had been involved in a similar project.
It's not clear where the vessel is welded. Are the cracks located such that the entire vessel needs preheating? Clearly, someone had to make this thing in the first place. Have you talked to the fabricator?

I've worked in shipyards where two large castings were welded together to form one large piece. The process was officially observed to make sure proper pre-heating of the zone to be welded was accomplished, but the whole piece did not need preheating. IIRC, the minimum preheat was about 1200 °F, which was to be confirmed by using a temperature indicating stick, such as this one:

http://www.tempil.com/products/tempilstik-original/

The welding zone of the cast pieces glowed an orange-reddish color when tested, and the heat coming from them was so intense that the person wielding the temp stick had to wear a welding glove and some extra insulation just to get close enough to check the piece.

It's also not clear what your experience is in such matters. I think you should consult with a welding engineer who has experience in the relevant ASME codes governing the construction of this device. Also, it doesn't cost anything to discuss this project with various individuals or companies. The people you talk to may not be able to handle a project this size, but that does not mean they can't steer you toward someone who might be able to manage it. You might also want to consider putting together a brief request for quotation which can be sent out for people to examine.
 
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Related to Heat treat 800H steel to 1600F -- any contractors that can do this?

1. What is the purpose of heat treating 800H steel to 1600F?

The purpose of heat treating 800H steel to 1600F is to improve the steel's mechanical properties, such as strength and hardness, by altering its microstructure through heating and cooling processes.

2. What are the benefits of heat treating 800H steel to 1600F?

The benefits of heat treating 800H steel to 1600F include increased strength, improved wear resistance, and enhanced ductility, making it suitable for use in high temperature and corrosive environments.

3. What is the recommended process for heat treating 800H steel to 1600F?

The recommended process for heat treating 800H steel to 1600F is to preheat the steel to 1200-1300F, hold it at this temperature for a specific time (depending on the thickness of the steel), and then heat it to 1600F and hold it at this temperature for a designated time. Finally, the steel is cooled in a controlled manner to achieve the desired microstructure.

4. Can any contractor perform heat treatment on 800H steel to 1600F?

No, not all contractors have the equipment and expertise to perform heat treatment on 800H steel to 1600F. It is important to choose a contractor with experience and knowledge in heat treating this specific type of steel to ensure proper and effective treatment.

5. How can I ensure the quality of heat treatment on 800H steel to 1600F?

To ensure the quality of heat treatment on 800H steel to 1600F, it is important to work with a reputable contractor who follows industry standards and has a proven track record of successful heat treatments. Additionally, conducting post-heat treatment testing and inspections can help verify the quality of the treatment.

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