1. Limited time only! Sign up for a free 30min personal tutor trial with Chegg Tutors
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Height and horizontal distance of a projectile

  1. Mar 12, 2015 #1
    1. The problem: I need to find the height and horizontal distance reached by a projectile given only the vertical and horizontal velocities. Vv=120m/s Vh= 30m/s this is for an algebra based physics class, I'm very new to this stuff.


    2. Relevant equations: V=at+Vo
    X=1\2at^2 + Vo + Xo



    3. The attempt at a solution: I think I was able to figure out the vertical height and time, getting t=12 and height as x=720
    but I have no idea where to go from here to find horizontal distance or anything else that would be necessary to finish the problem. Also, we are using 10m/s instead of 9.8m/s for the acceleration caused by gravity. I just need help with what the next step would be to figuring out the rest of the problem, do I just plug the numbers back into the formula in some way? I've just started taking physics, and I have no idea what I'm doing. Thanks in advance.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Mar 12, 2015 #2

    haruspex

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper
    Gold Member
    2016 Award

    X=1\2at^2 + Vo t + Xo
    There are two ways you could find the horizontal range. You could consider the horizontal distance to the reach the highest point and use symmetry, or you could use your equation to find when the vertical height becomes zero again.
     
  4. Mar 13, 2015 #3

    Suraj M

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    This time you have got, is it for the whole path or just midway
    You already finished the important part, now, do you think the horizontal velocity would change or remain constant?why? from there you can actually consider the horizontal motion as 1-D.
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Have something to add?
Draft saved Draft deleted



Similar Discussions: Height and horizontal distance of a projectile
Loading...