Help: Electricity and Magnetism Question

In summary, the equation F=BILsinθ can be used to find the magnitude of the force on a 1.0m length of each wire when two long, parallel wires with a distance of 1.0m between them have a current of 1.0A in each wire. This equation can be found by looking it up and will give the desired result.
  • #1
Cici2017
Two long, parallel wires are separated by a distance of 1.0m. The current in each wire is 1.0A. What is the magnitude of the force on 1.0 m length of each wire?

Help~ Thanks a lot
 
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  • #2
Cici2017 said:
Two long, parallel wires are separated by a distance of 1.0m. The current in each wire is 1.0A. What is the magnitude of the force on 1.0 m length of each wire?

Help~ Thanks a lot
Please fill up the three part template and show your working. It is mandatory while posting in the homework help forum.
 
  • #3
cnh1995 said:
Please fill up the three part template and show your working. It is mandatory while posting in the homework help forum.

Homework Statement


Two long, parallel wires are separated by a distance of 1.0m. The current in each wire is 1.0A. What is the magnitude of the force on 1.0 m length of each wire?

Homework Equations

The Attempt at a Solution


Do I use F=BILsinθ? But I don't know B nor θ.
Sorry~I have no idea. Help~
 
  • #4
Cici2017 said:

Homework Statement


Two long, parallel wires are separated by a distance of 1.0m. The current in each wire is 1.0A. What is the magnitude of the force on 1.0 m length of each wire?

Homework Equations

The Attempt at a Solution


Do I use F=BILsinθ? But I don't know B nor θ.
Sorry~I have no idea. Help~[/B]
There is an equation which directly gives the force between two current carrying conductors. You can look it up.
 
  • #5
cnh1995 said:
There is an equation which directly gives the force between two current carrying conductors. You can look it up.
Oh Yes! Found it! Thank you so much!
 

Related to Help: Electricity and Magnetism Question

1. What is the difference between electricity and magnetism?

Electricity and magnetism are two separate but related phenomena. Electricity involves the flow of electric charges, usually through a conductor like a wire. Magnetism, on the other hand, is the force exerted by magnets or moving electric charges. While electricity can create magnetism, the reverse is also true - a changing magnetic field can induce an electric current. This relationship is known as electromagnetism.

2. How do electricity and magnetism interact?

Electricity and magnetism are closely related and can interact with each other in various ways. For example, an electric current can create a magnetic field, and a changing magnetic field can induce an electric current. This phenomenon is used in many everyday devices, such as electric motors and generators.

3. What is the role of electrons in electricity and magnetism?

Electrons are negatively charged particles that play a crucial role in both electricity and magnetism. In electricity, electrons flow through conductors, creating an electric current. In magnetism, the movement of electrons within atoms creates a magnetic field. Electrons are also responsible for the attraction and repulsion of magnets.

4. What is the difference between AC and DC electricity?

AC (alternating current) and DC (direct current) are two types of electric currents. AC electricity changes direction periodically, while DC electricity flows in one direction. AC is typically used for long-distance power transmission, while DC is used for small-scale devices like batteries. Most household outlets provide AC electricity, while electronic devices often require DC electricity.

5. How are electricity and magnetism used in everyday life?

Electricity and magnetism have countless applications in our daily lives. Some common examples include household appliances, such as refrigerators and televisions, which use electricity to function. Magnetism is used in MRI machines for medical imaging, and in speakers to produce sound. Electricity is also used to power transportation, such as electric cars and trains.

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