Help with an equation about waves and wavelengths

In summary, The conversation discusses setting up a standing wave on a taut string and determining its wavelength and speed. The string has a frequency of 350 Hz and a length of 1 m with a total of 6 antinodes. With 3 fundamental waves present, the wavelength is 1/3 m and the wave velocity is calculated to be 116.666 Hz.
  • #1
BarelyPassing
1
0
1. A standing wave is set up on a taut string. The string is vibrated at a frequency of 350 Hz. The string is 1 m long and a total of 6 antinodes are counted along its length. What is the wavelength of the standing wave? And what is the speed of the wave in the string?



2.I'm unsure of relevant equations



3. I haven't made an attempt at the equation as its midterm and I just joined the Physics class.

All help is appreciated!
 
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  • #2
A point to be noted is that, in a vibrating string both ends of the string are fixed creating displacement nodes at those points.Now, the question says that there are 6 antinodes present on the string. So,the waves in vibrating string will contain 3 fundamental waves.
so,
3*wavelength=length of string
wav.=1/3 m
freq.=350 hz
so,
wave vel.=freq.*wavelength=116.666hz
 

Related to Help with an equation about waves and wavelengths

1. What is the equation for calculating the wavelength of a wave?

The equation for calculating the wavelength of a wave is: λ = v/f, where λ is the wavelength, v is the velocity of the wave, and f is the frequency.

2. How do I determine the frequency of a wave?

The frequency of a wave can be determined by using the equation: f = v/λ, where f is the frequency, v is the velocity of the wave, and λ is the wavelength.

3. What is the relationship between wavelength and frequency?

The relationship between wavelength and frequency is inverse - as one increases, the other decreases. This means that shorter wavelengths have higher frequencies, while longer wavelengths have lower frequencies.

4. Can this equation be used for all types of waves?

Yes, this equation can be used for all types of waves, including electromagnetic waves, sound waves, and water waves.

5. How do I use this equation to solve for the velocity of a wave?

To solve for the velocity of a wave, you can rearrange the equation to v = λf. Simply plug in the values for wavelength and frequency, and solve for v.

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