Help with picking specialisation (physics/economics)

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In summary, the conversation discusses a joint masters degree with a major in Engineering Physics and a minor in Economics. The speaker has evaluated their interests and narrowed down potential specialisations for the future, with a goal of earning as much money as possible. The speaker is seeking advice on the best combination of specialisations for this purpose, with options including Applied Mechanics, Optics and Photonics, Theoretical/Mathematical Physics, Microeconomics, Macroeconomics, International Economics, and Finance. However, the other person advises against solely focusing on earning potential and encourages the speaker to pursue their passion instead.
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Doing a joint masters degree with major in Engineering Physics and Minor in Economics. I have been evaluating my interests and come up with a shortlist of potential specialisations i am interested to work with in the future. I do not want to do a phD. My goal is to earn as much money as possible, and according to Labor Departments occupational outlook handbook, engineering manager is the way to go. I'd appreciate if someone could comment on the best combination of specialisations that will be useful for this purpose from the list below.

Possible specialisations in Eng. Physics (pick one):
Applied Mechanics
Optics and Photonics
Theoretical/Mathematical Physics
Atomic Physics and Elementary Particles

Possible specialisations in Economics (pick two):
Microeconomics
Macroeconomics
International Economics (Trade, monetary policy)
Finance



Thanks!o:)
 
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  • #2
so many problems with this methodology for picking a career. Do what you are passionate about.
 
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I can offer some insight into your dilemma. Firstly, it is important to remember that your interests and passions should also play a role in your decision-making process, not just the potential for high earnings. That being said, if your goal is to become an engineering manager and earn a high salary, then a combination of Applied Mechanics and Finance may be the most beneficial for you.

Applied Mechanics will provide you with a strong foundation in engineering principles and problem-solving skills, which are essential for an engineering manager. Additionally, understanding the financial aspect of engineering projects and companies will give you a competitive edge in the job market and make you a valuable asset to any company.

In terms of your minor in economics, choosing both Microeconomics and Finance will give you a well-rounded understanding of the economic principles and financial management. Microeconomics will provide you with the knowledge of how individuals and small businesses make economic decisions, while Finance will give you a deeper understanding of financial markets and investments.

However, it is important to note that there is no one "perfect" combination of specializations for everyone. It ultimately depends on your personal interests, strengths, and career goals. I would recommend researching job opportunities and industries that align with your interests and skills, and then choosing your specializations based on that.

Additionally, keep in mind that a joint master's degree in Engineering Physics and Economics is already a unique and valuable combination. You can always continue to learn and develop new skills throughout your career, so don't limit yourself to just one set of specializations.

I wish you the best of luck in your decision-making process and future endeavors. Remember to not only focus on earning potential, but also on pursuing a career that you are passionate about and will bring you fulfillment.
 

Related to Help with picking specialisation (physics/economics)

What is the difference between physics and economics?

Physics is a natural science that focuses on the study of matter, energy, and their interactions. It involves using mathematical and experimental methods to understand the fundamental laws of the universe. Economics, on the other hand, is a social science that deals with the production, distribution, and consumption of goods and services. It uses principles of mathematics, statistics, and psychology to analyze human behavior in relation to the economy.

Which specialisation has better job prospects?

Both physics and economics have strong job prospects, but it ultimately depends on your personal interests and skills. Physics graduates can find employment in industries such as technology, energy, and aerospace, while economics graduates can pursue careers in finance, consulting, and public policy.

Is it possible to combine physics and economics in a career?

Yes, there are many interdisciplinary fields that combine physics and economics, such as econophysics, financial engineering, and energy economics. These careers require a strong understanding of both subjects and can be highly rewarding.

Which specialisation is more challenging?

Both physics and economics can be challenging in different ways. Physics requires strong mathematical and analytical skills, while economics involves critical thinking and problem-solving. It's important to choose a specialisation that you find interesting and enjoy learning, as this can make the challenges more manageable.

What kind of skills and qualities are needed for success in each specialisation?

For success in physics, it's important to have a strong foundation in mathematics, problem-solving abilities, and a curious and analytical mindset. In economics, skills such as critical thinking, data analysis, and communication are essential. Both specialisations also require strong attention to detail, perseverance, and a passion for learning.

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