Hiroshima Little Boy Atomic Bomb Physics Help

In summary, the atomic bomb "Little Boy" used 64 kg of Uranium-235, but only 0.7 kg of the starting mass was involved in the explosion. Additionally, only 0.1% of the 0.7 kg was converted to energy during nuclear fission, resulting in 7 x 10^-4 kg of Uranium-235 being transformed into 6.3 x 10^13 Joules. This information is supported by the fact that the bomb was estimated to release 6.3 x 10^13 Joules of energy, according to the equation E=mc^2.
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Edgewood11
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Hiroshima "Little Boy" Atomic Bomb Physics Help

I just wanted some feedback on a paper I just finished. Did I do everything correctly and does it make sense? It seems my data supports information I found online: "It contained 64 kg (140 lb) of uranium, of which less than a kilogram underwent nuclear fission, and of this mass only 0.6 g (0.021 oz) was transformed into a different type of energy (initially kinetic energy, then heat and light)." http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Little_Boy

Hiroshima “Little Boy” Atomic Bomb
CameronFacts:

64 Kg of Uranium-235 used in bomb

6.3 x 10^13 Joules released (estimated) during explosion

Equation:

E = mc2

Energy Efficiency:

6.3 x 10^13 = m x (300,000,000)2

m = 7 x 10^-4

Only .1% of starting Uranium-235 is turned to energy thus,

(7 x 10^-4) / (.001) = .7 Kg

Conclusion:

“Little Boy” contained 64 Kg of Uranium-235 but, only .7 Kg of the starting mass was involved in the explosion. Furthermore, no more than .1% of the .7 Kg is converted to energy during nuclear fission. As a result, 7 x 10^-4 Kg of Uranium-235 was changed into 6.3 x 10^13 Joules.
 
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  • #2


Edgewood11 said:
“Little Boy” contained 64 Kg of Uranium-235 but, only .7 Kg of the starting mass was involved in the explosion. Furthermore, no more than .1% of the .7 Kg is converted to energy during nuclear fission. As a result, 7 x 10^-4 Kg of Uranium-235 was changed into 6.3 x 10^13 Joules.

0.7 kg Uranium was changed into 6.3 x 10^13 Joules and 0.6993 kg of fission products
 

Related to Hiroshima Little Boy Atomic Bomb Physics Help

1. What is the "Little Boy" atomic bomb?

The "Little Boy" atomic bomb was the codename for the atomic bomb that was dropped on the city of Hiroshima, Japan on August 6, 1945. It was a uranium-based bomb with an explosive yield of approximately 15 kilotons of TNT.

2. How did the atomic bomb work?

The atomic bomb used a process called nuclear fission to release a tremendous amount of energy. This process involves splitting the nucleus of an atom, in this case uranium, into smaller parts. When this happens, a huge amount of energy is released, creating a powerful explosion.

3. What was the impact of the atomic bomb on Hiroshima?

The atomic bomb caused widespread destruction and devastation in Hiroshima. It killed approximately 70,000 people instantly, and thousands more died from injuries and radiation sickness in the following months. The city was left in ruins, with many buildings and structures completely destroyed.

4. How did the atomic bomb affect the physics community?

The atomic bomb was a turning point in the field of physics. It was the first practical demonstration of nuclear fission and showed the immense power and destruction that could be caused by atomic weapons. This led to further research and development in the field of nuclear physics, as well as increased concerns and discussions about the ethical implications of atomic weapons.

5. Is the atomic bomb still used today?

The use of atomic bombs as weapons has been banned by international treaties, and there have been no further uses of atomic bombs in warfare since the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945. However, nuclear weapons still exist and are considered a major global security threat. Many countries, including the United States, maintain an arsenal of nuclear weapons for deterrence purposes.

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