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How can a photon have hadronic components?

  1. May 4, 2013 #1
    the wiki article on vector meson dominance says "hadronic components of the physical photons". How can a photon have hadronic photon components? Could someone please enlighten me?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. May 4, 2013 #2

    Bill_K

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    See another reference which gives a more complete description, such as this one. The basic idea is that a virtual photon turns into a quark-antiquark pair, which then turns into one of the vector mesons, and that furthermore all interactions of photons with hadrons take place predominantly via this process.
     
  4. May 4, 2013 #3
    what is a vector meson?
     
  5. May 4, 2013 #4

    Bill_K

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    A meson is a bound state consisting of a quark and an antiquark. Since each quark has spin 1/2, a meson can have either spin 0 or spin 1. The vector mesons are the ones that have spin 1.

    If you use just the three lightest quarks, (up, down, strange) you can make 3 x 3 = 9 vector mesons. The ones being discussed in connection with photon-hadron interactions are the ones that have charge 0, namely ρ0 (rest mass 770MeV), ω (780 MeV) and φ (1020 MeV). You can find much more about these particles, and also other mesons, on Wikipedia.
     
  6. May 4, 2013 #5
    thanks bill_k
     
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