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How can quantum tunneling create Big Bang after heat death?

  1. Nov 2, 2015 #1
    Wikipedia states that, after he heat death of the universe: "Random quantum fluctuations or quantum tunneling can produce another Big Bang in d4700e90b19b9ae1e3f0c49077041a08.png years."

    How would this work?
     
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  3. Nov 2, 2015 #2

    Chalnoth

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    The second law of thermodynamics, which states that entropy always increases, isn't an absolute. The true statement, rather, is that entropy usually increases. Reductions in entropy do occur, but with lower probability. A quantum fluctuation or tunneling event that started a new Big Bang would be just such a reduction of entropy.
     
  4. Nov 2, 2015 #3
    I do not understand, with atoms and particles so far apart, how could they possibly accumulate into enough mass to create a big bang?
     
  5. Nov 3, 2015 #4

    Chalnoth

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    The initial seed would be smaller than a proton. You don't need much of any mass (neither mass nor energy are conserved in an expanding universe).
     
  6. Nov 3, 2015 #5
    Less than a proton! This is totally above my head. Thank you for your help. Do you recommend any webpages or reading materials to help me further understand this theory?
     
  7. Nov 3, 2015 #6

    Chalnoth

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  8. Nov 3, 2015 #7
    I saw a discussion about the origin of the universe on Youtube once, I think it was an Issac Asimov debate, but not sure. From it, my understanding is that tiny pockets of empty space can just form out of the laws of quantum physics, and that the mathematics of general relativity say that completely empty space has an outward pressure and will expand rapidly. Rapidly expanding space is thought to create intense Hawking radiation which fills it with energy.

    I thought that the seed would have exactly zero energy?
     
  9. Nov 3, 2015 #8

    Chalnoth

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    That's not entirely clear. Maybe. It depends a bit upon how you define energy (General Relativity doesn't have an unambiguous definition for total energy, and in a lot of situations it's not even possible to come up with a definition of total energy).
     
  10. Nov 9, 2015 #9
    Why is heat death significant? I thought that according to the math, this sort of thing is happening everywhere all the time?
     
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