How Can You Protect an Egg in a Physics Experiment with Strict Guidelines?

In summary, the conversation is about an egg dropping experiment with specific rules and three tests to survive. The twist is that the container must survive all three tests without being changed. The speaker shares their own experience with the experiment, using water balloons to make their container lighter and achieving a high score until one balloon burst during the trials. The speaker also claims that NASA copied their idea for landing the Pathfinder probe on Mars.
  • #1
steph555
1
0
Alright, I am in Physics and my teacher is doing the typical egg dropping experiment
BUT!
we have rules

1. the volume of the container can be no bigger than 12in. by 12in. by 12in.
2. we can only use raw eggs, and the egg can't be drained
3. the container can't contain any fluids, or gels
4. it may contain no metal at all!
5. no food products!
6. it may not contain glass
7. egg must be able to be shown before and after each test
8. no parachutes!

the twist is that our egg must survive 3 tests
(we can't have different containers for the tasks)
1. dropped off the second story of our school
2. a 10lb weight will be dropped on it
3. smacked by a 2 by 4 piece of wood.
 
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  • #2
I did that when I was a kid too. There was complex scoring and your score basically got multiplied by an inverse of how much your container weighed - so the lighter the container, the more points you got.

All I did was get a bunch of the small-sized water balloons and inflated them - with air instead of water, though - and stuck them to the egg with tape. It was so light compared to anyone else's that if it had survived I would've received something like a thousand times anyone else's score. The teacher was all disgruntled that I had outsmarted his scoring system. But alas, one of the balloons I used burst during one of the trials and the egg cracked - immediate disqualification! I think it happened because the latex was dried-out and fatigued… if you use balloons at all, buy fresh ones!

NASA totally ripped off my idea when they landed the Pathfinder probe on Mars. I was robbed! I should have gotten royalties! Ah, glory days.

Airbags.jpg
 
  • #3


I am glad to see that your physics class is engaging in hands-on experiments like the egg drop. It is a great way to apply the principles of physics in a practical manner.

The rules that have been set for this experiment are important as they ensure that the results are comparable and the experiment is conducted safely. It is important to follow these rules to obtain accurate and reliable data.

I would suggest exploring different materials and designs for the container to protect the egg. Materials such as foam, bubble wrap, and cardboard can provide cushioning and protection for the egg. Additionally, incorporating shock-absorbing mechanisms like springs or rubber bands could help the egg survive the impact of the weight and the wooden plank.

It may also be beneficial to analyze the forces acting on the egg during each test and design the container to withstand those forces. This could involve calculations and experimentation with different materials and designs.

Overall, I am excited to see how your class tackles this challenge and how you apply your knowledge of physics to protect the egg. Remember to document your process and results carefully to draw meaningful conclusions from the experiment. Good luck!
 

Related to How Can You Protect an Egg in a Physics Experiment with Strict Guidelines?

1. What is an "Egg Drop" for a physics class?

An "Egg Drop" for a physics class is an experiment where students design and build a contraption that can protect a raw egg from breaking when dropped from a certain height. It is a common project in many physics classes to demonstrate concepts such as momentum, force, and energy.

2. How does an "Egg Drop" experiment relate to physics?

The "Egg Drop" experiment relates to physics because it involves the application of various physics principles such as gravity, acceleration, and energy transfer. Students use their knowledge of these concepts to design and build a contraption that can protect the egg from breaking when dropped.

3. What materials are typically used for an "Egg Drop" experiment?

The materials used for an "Egg Drop" experiment can vary, but some common items include straws, popsicle sticks, rubber bands, balloons, and cardboard. Students are often encouraged to use materials that are lightweight but can provide cushioning and absorb impact.

4. How do you determine the winner of an "Egg Drop" experiment?

The winner of an "Egg Drop" experiment is typically determined by the team whose egg does not break after being dropped from the designated height. The egg must remain intact and not have any cracks or leaks to be considered a successful drop.

5. What are some tips for a successful "Egg Drop" experiment?

Some tips for a successful "Egg Drop" experiment include carefully planning and designing your contraption, using materials that can absorb impact and cushion the egg, and testing your design multiple times before the final drop. It is also important to consider the height of the drop and any other variables that may affect the outcome of the experiment.

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