How do graduate schools look at non-core physics courses?

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How do graduate schools look at "non-core" physics courses?

If a graduate committee sees the transcript of a student who did well in all the core physics courses (≥B+) but in then see a C or C+ in a non-core physics course, say electronics? Could that essentially break an application or is there not much importance placed on these courses as long as the overall GPA is competitive? Is it worth retaking the class and getting an A? Unfortunately, I severely underestimated the final exam assuming it would be as straightforward as the term tests and decided to focus on my other classes at the time. Went in with a B+ and came out of the course with a C+.
 

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Student100
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Why would any one course break a graduate school application?

You're doing physics, think about this logically for a moment.
 
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Why would any one course break a graduate school application?

You're doing physics, think about this logically for a moment.

From what I've read, graduate school committees apparently look at grade on an individual basis (they are given the transcript after all, and not just your GPA).

Isn't a C+ an upper year physics class a major blemish that needs to be explained or justified to the graduate committee? In graduate school, that's a fail.
 
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Student100
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From what I've read, graduate school committees apparently look at grade on an individual basis (they are given the transcript after all, and not just your GPA).

Isn't a C+ an upper year physics class a major blemish that needs to be explained or justified to the graduate committee? In graduate school, that's a fail.

Change a C+ to a slew of C+'s. If the rest of your classes are A's and B+'s and you finish all your other classes with the same marks, I'd reason they look at it for what it is-a random anomaly that could have been caused by a multitude of factors.

It certainly isn't any sort of death knell.
 

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