How do I become a physicist in Puerto Rico?

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In summary, the individual is a 16-year-old interested in pursuing a degree in Quantum Physics, specifically Quantum Field Theory. They are unsure if a bachelor's degree in Physics from Puerto Rico would adequately prepare them for a future degree in the US. They are considering their options for college and are wondering if they can apply to US colleges later in their senior year of high school.
  • #1
Jahn
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Im 16 and going into my senior of high school. I am interested in Quantum Physics(Espacially Quantum Field Theory). But I am not sure if a bachellor’s in physics in Puerto Rico is worth it. And if they would actually prepare me for a future degree in the U.S. If that's not the case, do i still have time to consider getting a degree in physics.
 
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  • #2
Jahn said:
Im 16 and going into my senior of high school. I am interested in Quantum Physics(Espacially Quantum Field Theory). But I am not sure if a bachellor’s in physics in Puerto Rico is worth it. And if they would actually prepare me for a future degree in the U.S. If that's not the case, do i still have time to consider getting a degree in physics.

I waited to to allow someone more knowledgeable than me to answer. But since nobody stepped up to the plate...

I'm fairly sure that you could get into a graduate school in the US with a bachelor's degree from a good Puerto Rican university. But if that is a concern for you, you should try applying to mainland US colleges, as well as Puerto Rican schools.
 
  • #3
Jahn said:
Im 16 and going into my senior of high school. I am interested in Quantum Physics(Espacially Quantum Field Theory). But I am not sure if a bachellor’s in physics in Puerto Rico is worth it. And if they would actually prepare me for a future degree in the U.S. If that's not the case, do i still have time to consider getting a degree in physics.

The universities in Puerto Rico are not highly regarded in Physics. I'd contact the department of interest and ask some hard questions, which they may try and avoid if they are in recruiting mode. Ignore their sales pitch and insist on answers to these questions:

Over the last five years, how many BS degrees have been earned in your Physics program?

How many of these graduates took the Physics GRE, and what were their scores?

How many of your graduates went on to PhD programs in the US, and which schools did they attend?

If the school in Puerto Rico dodges these questions, or if their answers to these questions prove unsatisfactory, then you should consider other options.
 
  • #4
Dr. Courtney said:
The universities in Puerto Rico are not highly regarded in Physics. I'd contact the department of interest and ask some hard questions, which they may try and avoid if they are in recruiting mode. Ignore their sales pitch and insist on answers to these questions:

Over the last five years, how many BS degrees have been earned in your Physics program?

How many of these graduates took the Physics GRE, and what were their scores?

How many of your graduates went on to PhD programs in the US, and which schools did they attend?

If the school in Puerto Rico dodges these questions, or if their answers to these questions prove unsatisfactory, then you should consider other options.

Alright, let's say the physics program her is not what i should go for. I am taking the college board now on the 23th of june. And there I have to put 3 options for college. Heres he thing, I don't think I can put a college from the US because i must take the SAT for that. My question is whether I can apply later in my senior year of hs to college in the US.

Btw thanks for answering.
 
  • #5
Jahn said:
Alright, let's say the physics program her is not what i should go for. I am taking the college board now on the 23th of june. And there I have to put 3 options for college. Heres he thing, I don't think I can put a college from the US because i must take the SAT for that. My question is whether I can apply later in my senior year of hs to college in the US.

Btw thanks for answering.

Colleges in the US vary regarding whether they require the SAT or the ACT or either. I think you should take the ACT ASAP and then go from there regarding the colleges you apply to, with a focus on the ones at which you won't just gain admission, but have a fairly good chance at merit based scholarships. Trying to advise on colleges before you know your ACT or SAT score is a waste of time. The sooner you get your results, the sooner you can decide whether to stand pat with your score or make additional prep efforts and take it again.
 
  • #6
Jahn said:
Im taking the college board now on the 23th of june. And there I have to put 3 options for college. Heres he thing, I don't think I can put a college from the US because i must take the SAT for that.
Does "college board" mean something different in PR than in the mainland US? When I was in high school many years ago, "college board" and "SAT" meant the same thing in everyday language. More formally, the College Board is the organization that administers the SAT.

The three colleges that you will list are simply the ones that they will send scores to automatically. You can request later that they send scores to specific colleges/universities that are not on that list, that you actually apply to.
 
  • #7
jtbell said:
Does "college board" mean something different in PR than in the mainland US? When I was in high school many years ago, "college board" and "SAT" meant the same thing in everyday language. More formally, the College Board is the organization that administers the SAT.

The three colleges that you will list are simply the ones that they will send scores to automatically. You can request later that they send scores to specific colleges/universities that are not on that list, that you actually apply to.
The exam I will take is the PAA Puerto Rico. Theres also one for Latin America. I accidently called it college board since I am so used to it. Thats why I ask because colleges here ask for this results not SAT or anything else.
 
  • #8
Dr. Courtney said:
The universities in Puerto Rico are not highly regarded in Physics. I'd contact the department of interest and ask some hard questions, which they may try and avoid if they are in recruiting mode. Ignore their sales pitch and insist on answers to these questions:

Over the last five years, how many BS degrees have been earned in your Physics program?

How many of these graduates took the Physics GRE, and what were their scores?

How many of your graduates went on to PhD programs in the US, and which schools did they attend?

If the school in Puerto Rico dodges these questions, or if their answers to these questions prove unsatisfactory, then you should consider other options.

As an aside, you state that universities in Puerto Rico are not highly regarded in physics -- I'm curious if Puerto Rican universities are highly regarded in any other field (STEM or otherwise).
 

1. How long does it take to become a physicist in Puerto Rico?

It typically takes at least 4 years to complete a bachelor's degree in physics, followed by 2-3 years for a master's degree and an additional 3-5 years for a PhD. So, it can take a total of 9-12 years to become a physicist in Puerto Rico.

2. What are the educational requirements for becoming a physicist in Puerto Rico?

To become a physicist in Puerto Rico, you will need at least a bachelor's degree in physics or a related field such as engineering or mathematics. A master's degree and/or a PhD are also required for more advanced positions in research or academia.

3. What skills are necessary to become a physicist in Puerto Rico?

Some essential skills for becoming a physicist in Puerto Rico include strong analytical and critical thinking skills, problem-solving abilities, mathematical proficiency, and attention to detail. Good communication and teamwork skills are also important for collaborating with other scientists on research projects.

4. Are there any specific certifications or licenses required to become a physicist in Puerto Rico?

In Puerto Rico, there are no specific certifications or licenses required to become a physicist. However, obtaining a professional certification from a recognized organization, such as the American Physical Society, can demonstrate your expertise and enhance your job prospects.

5. What are some job opportunities for physicists in Puerto Rico?

Physicists in Puerto Rico can find employment in a variety of industries, including research and development, government agencies, education, and private companies. Some common job titles for physicists in Puerto Rico include research scientist, data analyst, and academic professor.

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