How Do I find Force when only Distance and Mass are given?

  • #1

Homework Statement:

Calculate the spring constant using the equation k equals force divided by stretched spring. Take the average of all trials, and use this value as the spring constant.

Relevant Equations:

force divided by the length of the spring in equilibrium
I'm doing a lab for physics where I attach different weights to a spring and to measure different types of potential energy. I have already successfully completed the experiment using the virtual lab in the link below. I did three different trials using weights of 50, 100, and 250 grams. I measured the initial distance from point zero with the ruler provided, the length of the spring when it's at equilibrium, and the highest and lowest points the various weights got to. There is a timer but there isn't really a good way to make it accurate as in order to start the experiments you have to click and drag the weights, and you would have to click the play button on the timer at the same time that you let the weight go. As this is not possible I really don't trust the timer. But in order to complete the experiment, I need to know the spring constant which is calculated by dividing the force by the length of the spring in equilibrium. Any help would be appreciated.

https://phet.colorado.edu/sims/html/masses-and-springs/latest/masses-and-springs_en.html
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
Nevermind I figured it out
 

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