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How do you double major in Physics and robotic engineering?

  • #1

Main Question or Discussion Point

I've done robotics since I was very young, and I've always loved physics. I'm a high school junior, and I will need to figure out what to apply for in terms of colleges. I wanted to do a double major in robotics and physics, although I'm not sure what aspect of physics I want to go into. Is this a viable option in college? thank you!
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
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I've done robotics since I was very young, and I've always loved physics. I'm a high school junior, and I will need to figure out what to apply for in terms of colleges. I wanted to do a double major in robotics and physics, although I'm not sure what aspect of physics I want to go into. Is this a viable option in college? thank you!
Depends on the commitments you have. Ie. would you have to work or BankOfMumAndDad? How fast you grasp concepts.
Time conflict with classes. I am dual majoring in math and physics, but I may need to drop this physics major. Since my math classes and physics classes overlap...

Most of the first two years is similar for physics and engineering majors. You take the full calculus series, ODE, LA, the intro chem course, intro physics sequence.
 
  • #3
jtbell
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I wanted to do a double major in robotics and physics, although I'm not sure what aspect of physics I want to go into. Is this a viable option in college?
Find a university that offers both majors. On its web site, look up the course requirements for both majors. Figure out whether the total number of hours is do-able in four years, taking into account duplicate requirements (as MidgetDwarf noted) and general-education requirements.

Then there's the issue of possible scheduling conflicts between courses required for the two majors. Those are probably difficult to find out about, years in advance, because course schedules can and do change.
 
  • #4
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Robotics is basically an engineering area. Why would you want to major in physics if your career interests are in robotics? Conversely, why would you want to study robotics if your career interests are in physics? It seems to me that some serious reflection is required about what you want to do with your life. College is not just about pursuing your several interests, but more about preparing for your life's work.
 
  • #5
Robotics is basically an engineering area. Why would you want to major in physics if your career interests are in robotics? Conversely, why would you want to study robotics if your career interests are in physics? It seems to me that some serious reflection is required about what you want to do with your life. College is not just about pursuing your several interests, but more about preparing for your life's work.
Hello,
Robotics engineering is one of the most rapidly developing career topics. Robotics is not confined to only artificial intelligence, it is a subject that can be applicable to many different career fields. As a high schooler, yes, I need a lot of reflection on what I want to do in the future, but I am hoping to supplement my learning with an engineering degree. I've heard that astronomy and astrophysics would be helped by an optical engineering or even electrical engineering degree, or even quantum mechanics and string theory/quantum field theory with computer science. I'm not trying to pursue my different career fields, I'm trying to understand whether a dual degree in physics and engineering would be viable. Thank you.
 
  • #6
972
223
Hello,
Robotics engineering is one of the most rapidly developing career topics. Robotics is not confined to only artificial intelligence, it is a subject that can be applicable to many different career fields. As a high schooler, yes, I need a lot of reflection on what I want to do in the future, but I am hoping to supplement my learning with an engineering degree. I've heard that astronomy and astrophysics would be helped by an optical engineering or even electrical engineering degree, or even quantum mechanics and string theory/quantum field theory with computer science. I'm not trying to pursue my different career fields, I'm trying to understand whether a dual degree in physics and engineering would be viable. Thank you.

I dunno much about the engineering, since I am majoring in pure mathematics/ physics. But I can offer a great piece of advice.

Since you are a junior in highschool, and not even a freshman in college. It is important to not plan so far into the future. Yes, it is important that you are exploring your interest. But maybe take some college courses first, to see if you can handle the workload for one major, let alone two.

Saying is easier than doing.

I do know a close friend of myne who recently graduated in chemical engineering and physics. This person found a way to combine both subjects...

One of my close friends has a doctorate in pure mathematics. Later in life, about 10 years after a math phd, this person went to study biology. Now she combined Mathematics with biology, mathematical modeling for biological systems, and works for a pharmaceutical company...
 

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