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How do you know the change in ml for a transition?

  1. Oct 21, 2014 #1
    For example, consider a transition of an electron from the 3p to the 1s shell. You know Δl = 1 because of the change from a p shell to an s shell, but I was taught that ml = -l, -l + 1, ..., l. However, to be an allowed transition, Δml must be equal to zero. If ml is a set of numbers, how do you know it's equal to zero so a transition can be allowed?
     
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  3. Oct 21, 2014 #2

    atyy

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