How does a cathode ray eject inner orbital electrons?

  • Thread starter joebobjoe
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(Since this is a coursework question and not a homework question, I deleted the template)

Both my chemistry and physics textbooks cite cathode rays as having the ability to excite or eject electrons from an atom (e.g., dielectric breakdown, x-ray spectroscopy). How can a stream of negatively charged electrons pull other negatively charged electrons away from an atom? This seems counter-intuitive to me. Any explanations would be helpful.

P.S.: I've already checked Wikipedia and Google.
 

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  • #2
Dick
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Why do you think they can't push them away from the atom? Why do they have to 'pull'? If they have enough energy they can disturb them in one way or another.
 

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