How Does a Crate's Impact Translate to Spring Compression?

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In summary, the 1.5kg crate falls from a height of 2.0m onto an industrial spring scale with a spring constant of 1.5 X 10^5 N/m. At its greatest compression, the reading on the scale is 14.75 N. By using the conservation of energy principle, it can be determined that the force on the spring is equal to 14.75 N, and the displacement of the spring is approximately 0.029 meters when the crate is at its greatest compression.
  • #1
blackout85
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A 1.5kg crate falls from a height of 2.0m onto an industrial spring scale with a spring constant of 1.5 X 10^5 N/m. At its greatest compression the reading on the scale is:

My work:

mgh= PE
(1.5kg*9.81m/s*2.0m)= 30J
The potential energy of the crate is 30J
The Force of the crate is 1.5kg* 9.81m= 14.75
Would the force of the crate be equal to the force of compression

Thank you
 
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  • #2
blackout85 said:
A 1.5kg crate falls from a height of 2.0m onto an industrial spring scale with a spring constant of 1.5 X 10^5 N/m. At its greatest compression the reading on the scale is:

My work:

mgh= PE
(1.5kg*9.81m/s*2.0m)= 30J
The potential energy of the crate is 30J
The Force of the crate is 1.5kg* 9.81m= 14.75
Would the force of the crate be equal to the force of compression

Thank you
You missed the spring part. The weight of the crate is 14.75 N, but the force on the spring is, per Hookes law, F =kx.
One way to solve for x is to use the conservation of energy principle, noting that initial energy (which is just potential) is equal to final energy (which is just the spring (stored) elastic potential energy , 1/2kx^2. (There is no kinetic energy in the initaial or final case). Try to solve for x, then F.
 
  • #3
for your question. Based on the information provided, it appears that the force of the crate would not be equal to the force of compression. This is because the force of compression is dependent on the spring constant and the displacement of the spring, while the force of the crate is dependent on its mass and the acceleration due to gravity. In this scenario, the force of the crate is 14.75 N, while the force of compression can be calculated using the formula F = -kx, where k is the spring constant and x is the displacement. Since the displacement is not given, we cannot accurately calculate the force of compression. However, we can say that it will be greater than 14.75 N, as the crate's weight is the only force acting on the spring at the point of greatest compression. I hope this helps clarify your question.
 

What is "Spring and Crate"?

"Spring and Crate" is a physics experiment that involves a spring and a crate or box. The experiment demonstrates the relationship between the force applied to a spring and the resulting displacement of the spring.

What materials are needed for the "Spring and Crate" experiment?

The materials needed for the "Spring and Crate" experiment include a spring, a crate or box, a ruler or measuring tape, and weights or objects to add weight to the crate. Optional materials may include a stopwatch or timer to measure time.

How does the "Spring and Crate" experiment work?

In the "Spring and Crate" experiment, the spring is attached to the crate and the crate is placed on a flat surface. Weights are then added to the crate, causing the spring to compress. The displacement of the spring is measured and recorded. This process is repeated with different weights, and the resulting data is used to determine the spring constant and potential energy of the spring.

What is the purpose of the "Spring and Crate" experiment?

The "Spring and Crate" experiment serves to demonstrate the relationship between force and displacement in a spring. It also allows for the calculation of the spring constant and potential energy of the spring, which are important concepts in physics.

What are the applications of the "Spring and Crate" experiment?

The "Spring and Crate" experiment has applications in various fields, including engineering, material science, and physics. It can also be used as a teaching tool to help students understand the principles of force, displacement, and potential energy in a hands-on and interactive way.

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