How Does Speed Affect Car Stopping Distance?

In summary, the minimum stopping distance for a car traveling at a speed of 30m/s is 60m, including the distance traveled during the driver's reaction time of 0.44s. To find the minimum stopping distance for the same car traveling at a speed of 41m/s, the equation 0=a*1.56s+30 m/s can be used to find the acceleration, which is -19m/s/s. The distance at 41m/s can then be calculated using the equation 0.44s*41m/s+ 1/2*(-19m/s/s*(1.56s)^2)+41m/s*1.56s. It is important to note that the equation
  • #1
HaLAA
85
0

Homework Statement


the minimum distance for a car traveling at a speed of 30m/s is 60 m, including the distance traveled during the driver's reaction time of 0.44s. what is the minimum stopping distance for the same car traveling at the speed of 41m/s?

v=30m/s, s=60m
drivers' reaction time = 0.44s

2. The attempt at a solution
because the car traveling at a speed of 30m/s and the distance is 60m, so I find the traveling time 60m/30m/s=2s, and the driver's reaction time is 0.44s, thus the entire stopping time is 2s-0.44s=1.56s.
 
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  • #2
60m / 30 m/s is indeed 2 s. After, say 1.5 seconds, is the speed still 30 m/s ? In other words: can you really use the equation you are using in the case described ? Or do you need some other equations ?

Oh, and: wecome to PF :-)

Jsut so you know: using the template is mandatory. And the template has 1, 2 and 3. Especially 2 is of interest in your situation.
 
  • #3
BvU said:
60m / 30 m/s is indeed 2 s. After, say 1.5 seconds, is the speed still 30 m/s ? In other words: can you really use the equation you are using in the case described ? Or do you need some other equations ?

Oh, and: wecome to PF :)

Jsut so you know: using the template is mandatory. And the template has 1, 2 and 3. Especially 2 is of interest in your situation.
the entire travling timie is 2s, I am sure. Then at the end the travel the speed I think is 0 m/s. So I think I can do

0=a*1.56s+30 m/s to fine the a which is -19m/s/s. Because it is the same car, I think the acceleration is the same.
thus, the distance at 41m/s, I think it should be 0.44s*41m/s+ 1/2*(-19m/s/s*(1.56s)2)+41m/s*1.56s
 
  • #4
the entire traveling time is 2s, I am sure
No, it is not. Fill in 30 m/s instead of 41 m/s in your last expression and you don't get 60 m.

So, no template used, and still I have given some assistance. I hope I don't get banned from PF for doing so.
Perhaps I haven't made clear that, although I conceded that 60 m / 30 m/s = 2 s, that is the wrong equation to use.
That is also the argument for wanting you to use the template: That equation you don't provide applies to uniform motion with constant velocity, no acceleration therefore. So it does NOT apply to the situation after 0.44 s.

All remaining steps you make are impeccable: you can indeed assume that the deceleration for different speeds is the same and your last expression is just fine. Now find the right a.
 
  • #5
Using the formula s=ut+1/2at^2, I can calculate the minimum stopping distance for the same car traveling at a speed of 41m/s by substituting the values for velocity (u=41m/s), time (t=1.56s) and acceleration (a=-30m/s^2, as the car is decelerating). This gives a minimum stopping distance of 64.62m. Therefore, the minimum stopping distance for the car traveling at a speed of 41m/s is 64.62m.
 

Related to How Does Speed Affect Car Stopping Distance?

1. What is the purpose of finding the minimum distance?

The purpose of finding the minimum distance is to determine the shortest possible distance between two points or objects. This can be useful in various fields such as physics, engineering, and data analysis.

2. How is the minimum distance calculated?

The minimum distance is typically calculated using mathematical formulas such as the Pythagorean theorem or the distance formula. These formulas take into account the coordinates or parameters of the two points or objects to determine the distance between them.

3. Can the minimum distance be negative?

No, the minimum distance cannot be negative. Distance is a measure of the space between two points and it is always a positive value. If the two points are in opposite directions, the distance would be considered as the sum of their distances from an origin point.

4. What are some real-life applications of finding the minimum distance?

Finding the minimum distance is commonly used in navigation, transportation, and logistics to determine the most efficient route between two points. It is also used in physics to calculate the shortest path of a moving object and in data analysis to determine the similarity between data points.

5. Are there any limitations to finding the minimum distance?

There can be limitations to finding the minimum distance, depending on the specific situation. For example, the calculations may not be accurate if the points or objects are constantly moving or if there are obstacles in the way. Additionally, certain mathematical formulas may not be applicable in certain scenarios.

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