How does your Garden grow? part 2

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  • #2
Evo
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Meyer lemons.jpg
Due to the last batch of friendly squirrels that didn't dig in my pots, I have decided to grow a few container vegetables again this summer(one was too friendly, allowing my dog Ming to come up to it and sniff it, Ming is a very sloooow and calm dog). I decided not to let the squirrel get too comfortable because we have some stray cats that live in the ravine. Of course a new batch of baby squirrels have visited and at least one started digging in a few pots. Of course. I have to put rocks over the top of the dirt, but they still climb into the plants. :oldfrown:

I am very happy with the two little citrus trees I bought last year, I wintered them in my bedroom under grow lights and they bloomed and set fruit all winter. The first batch of lemons are starting to ripen.
 
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  • #3
Astronuc
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I am very happy with the two little citrus trees I bought last year, I wintered them in my bedroom under grow lights and they bloomed and set fruit all winter. The first batch of lemons are starting to ripen.
Nice!
 
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  • #4
Evo
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I bought two "bush celebrity" tomatoes for container growing, they were the only variety of bush tomato at the grocery store (they always have very nice plants from a local nursery). The description tag just said "short and compact", so I looked it up when I got home. Lots of conflicting information, says "no staking required" which is what I wanted, then another site said "bush variety grows to 4 feet and requires staking", and the regular plant grows to 10 feet! i was thinking it would be like the bush varieties like bush early girl that grows to 18 inches. Anyone have any experience with bush celebrity? It sounds great, incredibly disease resistant, large tasty tomatoes, but 4 feet in a container is not my idea of "short and compact".
 
  • #5
Evo
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  • #6
Borek
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The one I liked (got it from Pepper Joe as a freebie) is no longer available from them, and I am not sure if I have seeds (I mean - I have some seeds, but they are probably some cross-breeds).
 
  • #7
Astronuc
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I'm, picking out pepper plants @dlgoff , @OmCheeto , @Borek @Astronuc , @turbo . Any suggestions? Favorites? Ones that taste good and produce well? Squirrel proof?
Of course, I like hot peppers like habaneros.

What kind of peppers were the squirrels taking? I would expect you might prefer sweet peppers.
 
  • #8
Evo
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Of course, I like hot peppers like habaneros.

What kind of peppers were the squirrels taking? I would expect you might prefer sweet peppers.
Yeah, my esophagus and GERD demand mild peppers, so I'm looking for some with a lot of flavor, but little heat.
 
  • #10
ZapperZ
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So I planted 3 rhododendron about 3 years ago. One died, one did very well (purple flowers), and the last one, I wasn't sure of. The past 2 years, it didn't flower, and the plant didn't look very healthy at all. I continued to make sure it has mulch and fertilizers.

Then suddenly, this year, it grew healthy and it flowered for the first time!

Tbrwuc.jpg

gpfutr.jpg


It is a different plant then the other surviving rhododendron because the leaves are thicker, and the flowers are these deep, red color (the photos don't do it justice). I wish I had the specie name, but the tag has been lost for a long time. And unlike the other rhododendron that flowered early in the spring, this one comes a bit later and it is now at the peak.

I hope it will continue to thrive, because it adds needed color to the far corner of my yard. My neighbor loves it because it faces right at his family room.

Zz.
 
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  • #11
Evo
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That's beautiful Zz! I guess it just wanted to know it was loved.
 
  • #12
Astronuc
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So I planted 3 rhododendron about 3 years ago. One died, one did very well (purple flowers), and the last one, I wasn't sure of. The past 2 years, it didn't flower, and the plant didn't look very healthy at all. I continued to make sure it has mulch and fertilizers.
Nice Zz. Could soil pH or moisture have been a factor in the demise of one of your rhododendrons, or perhaps air temperature?

http://www.rhododendron.org/soil.htm
 
  • #13
ZapperZ
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Nice Zz. Could soil pH or moisture have been a factor in the demise of one of your rhododendrons, or perhaps air temperature?

http://www.rhododendron.org/soil.htm
Not sure, but all three were in planted in almost the same location, next to each other.

Zz.
 
  • #14
Evo
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Ok, by the time I decided on peppers, not much available, got a california wonder, a Bonnie Green Belle, and two poblano (ancho) peppers, due to the cold wet weather all spring, they are dropping all of their blossoms. The tomatoes haven't dropped blossoms, but I can't tell if any are going to set, it's like suspended animation. :oldfrown:
 
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I forgot my peppers when I travelled back to my dorm room :-(
 
  • #16
Evo
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I forgot my peppers when I travelled back to my dorm room :-(
Oh no :(, you can probably pick some up at a local store, everyone sells seedlings this time of year.

Oh, i also bought a cajun belle pepper, supposedly a spicy version of a bell pepper, but didn't notice until i got it home that the main stem had broken about 2 inches above the soil. But the side shoots are coming up and there are some tiny buds.

checkout lady: "do you want these in a bag?'

Me: No, they might get damaged

Me: pays and goes to get plants, they're all thrown into a bag :(
 
  • #17
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Oh no :(, you can probably pick some up at a local store, everyone sells seedlings this time of year.
Just here a couple more weeks so I'll manage. And if need be I can always go get em if I want to travel 4 hours (there and back).
Trains are great to get some stuff done for me, no distractions etc.
 
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  • #18
dlgoff
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Ok, by the time I decided on peppers, not much available, got a california wonder, a Bonnie Green Belle, and two poblano (ancho) peppers, due to the cold wet weather all spring, they are dropping all of their blossoms. The tomatoes haven't dropped blossoms, but I can't tell if any are going to set, it's like suspended animation. :oldfrown:
I feel your pain. Except for the tomato plants, I've had to replant (green-house starts) my three varieties of peppers, my zucchinis, and my cantaloupes. And it looks like these are drowning as well. I'm even letting the strawberries rot on the plant, as there hasn't been any sun to sweeten them. :oldcry:
 
  • #19
Evo
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I feel your pain. Except for the tomato plants, I've had to replant (green-house starts) my three varieties of peppers, my zucchinis, and my cantaloupes. And it looks like these are drowning as well. I'm even letting the strawberries rot on the plant, as there hasn't been any sun to sweeten them. :oldcry:
Oh no! This spring has been really bad. Another storm has just started. No sun, rain, and more rain, humidity and cold. :frown:
 
  • #20
dlgoff
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Oh no! This spring has been really bad. Another storm has just started.
And if that isn't bad enough. The fruit trees will suffer from the 17 year cicadas. I took this pic before sundown.

17year.png


Opps: I didn't realize the height restriction for images before uploading. Sorry Greg.
 
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  • #21
Evo
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And if that isn't bad enough. The fruit trees will suffer from the 17 year cicadas. I took this pic before sundown.

View attachment 84493
Oh NO! it just seems that the past several years have been cold springs, cool summers, and from a new paper published in Nature, for the Midwest, it's going to get worse. At least I only have a few pots to cry over, you have an entire field.
 
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  • #22
Borek
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This is not going to be a good year. Despite starting on a window sill in March my peppers are just 5" high and no blossoms at all. Winter was pretty mild, but Spring was ugly, up to now temperature was for most of the time in low sixties.
 
  • #23
lisab
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Seems like I might be one of the rare ones here with favorable weather! Spring has been beautiful so far, and the summer forecast calls for above-average temperatures.

The garden is off to a great start. For the last two years we've amended our clay soil with mushroom compost. [brag] It's beautiful soil now! [/brag]

I may have mentioned before that where I live, the trick to gardening isn't getting things to grow -- it's getting things not to grow. So this morning, I spent time removing the notabeans from the beans, and the notakohlrabi from the kohlrabi. Back-breaking work but very necessary and satisfying.

I met one shy snake and many spiders. All were kind enough to move out of my way.

But it got hot. Being neither a mad dog nor an Englishman, I retreated to the cool comfort of my house.
 
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