How is physical Information "encoded"?

In summary, the holographic principle in physics states that physical particles and interactions can be described in bits. This means that information is always tied to a physical representation, such as an engraving on a stone tablet or a mark on paper. A concrete example of this is a one bit element, such as a single-domain ferroelectric particle, which can be forced to assume two states corresponding to "0" and "1". However, the question of how all other aspects of the particle, such as position, direction, and velocity, are encoded remains unanswered. Our understanding of information in physics is constantly evolving, and there are ongoing discussions and insights about this topic.
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TL;DR Summary
I hear a lot about "information" in physics, but no concrete ideas on exactly how that information works.
I've been reading about the Holographic Principle, and this concept of information in physics came up. The idea that physical particles and interactions can be described in bits.

But, how exactly would those bits work? Is this even a meaningful question?

Could someone provide a concrete example of some small physical interaction and then show how some set of bits map onto the particles and forces?

If not, why not?

(My background is in computer science, so I already have a certain view of what "information" is.)
 
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Rolf Landauer in “The physical nature of information” (Physics Letters A, Volume 217, Issues 4–5, 15 July 1996, Pages 188-193):

"Information is not a disembodied abstract entity; it is always tied to a physical representation. It is represented by engraving on a stone tablet, a spin, a charge, a hole in a punched card, a mark on paper, or some other equivalent. This ties the handling of information to all the possibilities and restrictions of our real physical word, its laws of physics and its storehouse of available parts."

A simple example would be a one bit element which can be forced to assume one of two possibilities which are favored by a bistable potential (two minima separated by a barrier). A physical example could be a single-domain ferroelectric particle. The polarization direction in this domain can be reversed by the application of an electric field of appropriate strenght; so, one can "encode" two states corresponding - say - to "0" and "1". (see, for example, https://www.mm.ethz.ch/research_ferroelectrics.html)
 
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But what about the information describing all other aspects of it? Position, direction, velocity, etc?
 

Related to How is physical Information "encoded"?

1. How is physical information encoded?

Physical information can be encoded in various ways, depending on the type of information and the medium it is being encoded in. Some common methods of encoding physical information include binary code, Morse code, and DNA sequencing.

2. What is binary code and how is it used to encode information?

Binary code is a system of representing information using only two digits, 0 and 1. It is commonly used in electronic devices and computer systems to store and transmit data. Each character or piece of information is represented by a unique combination of 0s and 1s, making it a highly efficient way to encode and process information.

3. How does Morse code work to encode information?

Morse code is a method of encoding information using a series of dots and dashes to represent letters and numbers. It was originally used in telegraph systems to transmit messages over long distances. Each letter or number has a unique combination of dots and dashes, making it a simple yet effective way to encode and decode information.

4. Can physical information be encoded in DNA?

Yes, DNA can be used as a medium to store and transmit information. This is known as DNA sequencing, where the sequence of nucleotides (A, T, C, and G) in DNA is used to represent data. This method has been used in various fields, such as storing large amounts of data and identifying genetic information in organisms.

5. How is physical information encoded in everyday objects?

Physical information can be encoded in everyday objects in various ways. For example, barcodes on products use a combination of lines and spaces to represent information such as product name and price. QR codes use a matrix of black and white squares to store data, which can be scanned and decoded using a smartphone. RFID tags use radio frequency signals to store and transmit information, commonly used in tracking and identification systems.

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