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How is the unit of quantum space time (given) a value

  1. May 24, 2006 #1

    wolram

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    Is it energy? how is the unit of quantum space time (given) a value, so it can multiply several times over, is there a limit when the (energy) will be exhausted ?
     
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  3. May 24, 2006 #2

    marcus

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    one always needs to point out (even though you and I know this well) that these very fundamental questions are not yet answerable because there is not yet a complete theory of quantum spacetime and matter

    but my feeling is that there will be a theory that will be properly completed and checked out so that one can accord it some credibility

    and it will probably have a built in UPPER LIMIT on the amount of energy which a single particle can have

    and this limit will be roughly on the order of 2 billion joules WHICH IS ENOUGH TO FILL THE PETROL TANK OF YOUR CAR and drive 100 miles or so with. actual mileage may vary, since this is just an order of magnitude estimate------our gracious dame Nereid calls it an OOM estimate.

    a single particle carrying that much whallop is quite inconceivable to me, but if there were one then it would have a quantum WAVELENGTH (giving a fuzzy idea of localizing it in space) equal to the PLANCK LENGTH

    this is the fractious recalcitrance of nature which fiercely resists being pinned down----you only can clamp a particle wavelength down by increasing its energy-----or else give up and change to a different particle with higher energy and shorter wavelength.

    Maybe this upper limit on the energy of particles is not what you asked.

    Maybe you are thinking of some upper limit on the combined energy of BUNCHES of particles. Except for accidentally getting so much together in a small space that they collapse to make a hole, I dont know of any upper limit.

    =========
    always fun thinking about questions you ask wolram, even if often can't give a satisfactory answer
     
    Last edited: May 24, 2006
  4. May 24, 2006 #3

    wolram

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    But Marcus ,these oscilations can not excede c and can not be less than
    the hubble, so they (must ) be betwicx these two values ?
     
  5. May 24, 2006 #4
    Can you talk about transversing a Planck length in a giving time? How can you transverse a quantum of something, either it is one or the other, one side or the other side of the Planck length in no time at all, right?
     
  6. May 24, 2006 #5

    marcus

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    wolram if you completely stump me then I will just have to be quiet and wait for some passerby to tell us the answer

    [edit] Ah, Mike2 appeared I see.
     
  7. May 24, 2006 #6

    wolram

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    sorry Mike but no time at all makes no sense. Spacetime inferses time, as a part of the theory so how can you negate one part of it
     
  8. May 24, 2006 #7
    Sorry, I was thinking of space only. Maybe you're right, chunks of spacetime would include a chunck of time.

    But now I'm not sure, ... the Planck length ... that's not the measure of quantized space (only)?
     
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