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How is the wave equation derived?

  1. Apr 23, 2008 #1
    Hi All,

    Question: "How is the wave equation derived?

    This is the question.

    Here is my answer. I am trying to ensure that it is correct.

    "To derive wave equation, we apply Newton's law to an elastic string, concluding that small amplitude transverse vibrations of the string obey the wave equation"

    (2) Then What are the three components necessary for this equation?

    (3) What does each mean?

    My question: Are the three components referred to in question 2, Newton's 2nd law, constitutive relations and the liberal application of linearization?

    Please help clarify
  2. jcsd
  3. Apr 23, 2008 #2
    I dont understand what your saying. Take a differential element of a string and do a force balance on it.

    Id really look into a PDE book if I were you.

    Yes, it is based on a linearization of the sine and cosine functions around small angles.

  4. Apr 23, 2008 #3
    Hello mcmzie.
    Unless you're in a very unusual physics class, you're expected to do a lot of math, not write a lot of words.
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