How many electrons on each level type

In summary, the quantum number l determines the type of orbital (s, p, d, etc.) and for each orbital there are 2l+1 types. This explains why the s orbital can hold 2 electrons, p orbitals can hold 6, d orbitals can hold 10, and f orbitals can hold 14.
  • #1
transgalactic
1,395
0
i know s=2 p=6

what d=??
 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
Each class of orbital (s, p, d, f, g, etc.) is described by a quantum number l, known as the angular quantum number. For each class of orbital, there are 2l+1 types of orbitals. For example, for the s orbital (l = 0), there is only one type of s orbital. For p orbitals (l = 1), there are three types of p orbitals (px, py, and pz). Since each orbital can hold two electrons, you can see why the s orbitals can hold only two electrons, while the p orbitals can hold six.

Based on this information, you should be able to see why the d orbitals can hold ten electrons and the f orbitals can hold 14.
 
  • #3
thanks
 

Related to How many electrons on each level type

1. How many electrons can fit on each energy level?

The number of electrons that can fit on each energy level is determined by the formula 2n^2, where n is the energy level number. For example, the first energy level (n=1) can hold a maximum of 2 electrons, the second energy level (n=2) can hold a maximum of 8 electrons, and so on.

2. What is the maximum number of electrons on the outermost energy level?

The maximum number of electrons on the outermost energy level, also known as the valence level, is 8. This is the case for all elements with the exception of hydrogen and helium, which can only hold a maximum of 2 valence electrons.

3. How does the number of electrons on each energy level affect an atom's chemical properties?

The number of electrons on each energy level determines an atom's chemical properties. The outermost energy level, which contains the valence electrons, is the most important in determining an atom's reactivity and ability to bond with other atoms. Atoms with a full outermost energy level are stable and less likely to form bonds, while atoms with unfilled outer energy levels are more reactive and likely to form bonds with other atoms in order to achieve a full outermost energy level.

4. Can the number of electrons on each energy level change?

Yes, the number of electrons on each energy level can change. Atoms can gain or lose electrons through chemical reactions, creating ions with a different number of electrons than their neutral state. Additionally, electrons can be excited to higher energy levels through the absorption of energy, and then return to a lower energy level by releasing that energy in the form of light.

5. How does the number of electrons on each energy level relate to an element's position on the periodic table?

The number of electrons on each energy level is directly related to an element's position on the periodic table. Elements in the same group have the same number of valence electrons, which contributes to similar chemical properties. Additionally, as you move from left to right across the periodic table, the number of valence electrons increases by one for each element, until reaching a full outermost energy level at the far right side of the table.

Similar threads

  • Biology and Chemistry Homework Help
Replies
4
Views
2K
  • Biology and Chemistry Homework Help
Replies
2
Views
2K
  • Biology and Chemistry Homework Help
Replies
9
Views
2K
  • Biology and Chemistry Homework Help
Replies
7
Views
4K
  • Biology and Chemistry Homework Help
Replies
7
Views
2K
  • Biology and Chemistry Homework Help
Replies
0
Views
194
  • Biology and Chemistry Homework Help
Replies
5
Views
965
  • Biology and Chemistry Homework Help
Replies
8
Views
1K
  • Biology and Chemistry Homework Help
Replies
1
Views
1K
  • Atomic and Condensed Matter
Replies
0
Views
552
Back
Top