1. Not finding help here? Sign up for a free 30min tutor trial with Chegg Tutors
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Studying How much time it takes to know all physics concepts?

  1. May 16, 2016 #1
    I have completed my engineering by now. I have decided to continue my further studies in Mathematics and to be aware of all physics concepts required for research. How can I study all physics concepts from home and what time would it take for me ?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. May 16, 2016 #2

    Drakkith

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    Research in what field?
     
  4. May 16, 2016 #3
    Nobody can learn "all physics concepts". Once you get past a certain point, you have to specialize, because there's too much for one person to know.
     
  5. May 16, 2016 #4
    Research in advanced physics, astronomy, space science and cosmology
     
  6. May 16, 2016 #5
    Yes thats right. Its not possible to know all concepts.
    But i want to be aware of physics concepts needed for higher studies and research.
     
  7. May 16, 2016 #6

    Drakkith

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    It is impossible. There's simply too much to know. If you've been trained as an engineer, then go be an engineer. If you want to be an astrophysicist, then go back to school to become an astrophysicist.
     
  8. May 16, 2016 #7

    Choppy

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Education Advisor

    Rakesh Mittal, I'm not sure you're asking the question that you actually want an answer to. I suspect what you're really trying to ask is how much time is it going to take you to build a foundation strong enough that you can do research in these areas. Obviously a lot of that is going to depend on how much you are comfortable now, what other demands there are on your time, and how quickly you learn things.

    Typically people start getting to the point where they can start doing mentored research about a year or so into their graduate studies. That's after having done a 4 year degree of full time study as an undergraduate. And even then, the research is very focussed in one area, and it requires a large degree of input from a supervisor who conducts independent research in the field.

    Studying on your own, without mentorship is very difficult, because you don't have much by way of feedback to know if you're understanding things properly or not. That's not so say it's impossible, but if you're really serious about mastering physics to the point where you can do research in these areas, you should seriously consider graduate studies.
     
  9. May 16, 2016 #8
    It's pretty difficult to learn all Physics concepts because not only are there so many but there are probably just as many, or more, which we don't know about yet. Since you're such an eager beaver, start discovering a few of your own. There's a statue in Stockholm waiting for you if you do...
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Have something to add?
Draft saved Draft deleted