How to find vertical comp. of velcocity?

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In summary, the vertical component of velocity is one of the two components of velocity that describes an object's motion in the upward or downward direction. To calculate it, you need to know the object's initial velocity, acceleration due to gravity, and time elapsed. The acceleration due to gravity is a constant value that represents the rate at which objects accelerate towards the Earth. Air resistance can affect the vertical component of velocity by slowing down an object's descent. The vertical component of velocity can be negative if the object is moving in a downward direction, but the magnitude of the velocity will still be positive.
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If, only the initial velocity in x direction is given and the total distance "S" is given for a non horizontal projectile, how do we find the y (vertical) component of initial velocity? No angle given?
 
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If you know the horizontal speed and distance you know the time.
You can then work out how fast an object must be thrown vertically to take this time to go up and land again.
 
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To find the vertical component of velocity in this scenario, we can use the equation for displacement in the y-direction:

S = ut + 1/2at^2

Where S is the total distance, u is the initial velocity in the y-direction, a is the acceleration due to gravity (9.8 m/s^2), and t is the time.

Since we are given the total distance and the initial velocity in the x-direction, we can use basic trigonometry to find the time it takes for the projectile to reach the ground. Once we have the time, we can plug it into the equation and solve for the initial velocity in the y-direction.

Alternatively, we can also use the equation for projectile motion in the y-direction:

y = uyt - 1/2gt^2

Where y is the vertical displacement, u is the initial velocity in the y-direction, g is the acceleration due to gravity, and t is the time.

Again, we can use basic trigonometry to find the time and then solve for the initial velocity in the y-direction.

It is important to note that without knowing the angle of launch, we cannot determine the exact value of the initial velocity in the y-direction. However, we can find the range of possible values using the above equations and the maximum height of the projectile.
 

Related to How to find vertical comp. of velcocity?

1. What is vertical component of velocity?

The vertical component of velocity refers to the speed at which an object is moving in an upward or downward direction. It is one of the two components of velocity, along with the horizontal component, that describes the object's overall motion.

2. How do I calculate the vertical component of velocity?

To calculate the vertical component of velocity, you will need to know the object's initial velocity, the acceleration due to gravity, and the time elapsed. You can then use the formula v = u + at, where v is the final velocity, u is the initial velocity, a is the acceleration, and t is the time, to calculate the vertical component of velocity.

3. What is the acceleration due to gravity?

The acceleration due to gravity is a constant value that represents the rate at which objects accelerate towards the Earth. On Earth, this value is approximately 9.81 m/s², but it can vary slightly depending on location and altitude.

4. How does air resistance affect the vertical component of velocity?

Air resistance, also known as drag, can affect the vertical component of velocity by slowing down the object's descent. As an object moves through the air, the air molecules push against it, creating a force that opposes the object's motion. This force can decrease the object's vertical velocity, making it fall more slowly.

5. Can the vertical component of velocity ever be negative?

Yes, the vertical component of velocity can be negative if the object is moving in a downward direction. In physics, upwards is typically considered the positive direction, so any motion in the opposite direction (downwards) would be represented by a negative velocity. However, the magnitude (or size) of the velocity would still be positive.

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