How to pronounce Lebesgue ?

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Main Question or Discussion Point

How to pronounce "Lebesgue"?

Like the title says how do I pronounce Lebesgue?
 

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  • #2
turbo
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Unless the name has been anglicized, it should be pronounced le-BECK
 
  • #3
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I'm worried about "Stieltjes".
 
  • #4
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"STEELT-yes", as far as I know.
 
  • #5
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Any chance i can hijack and get a Noether? =]
 
  • #6
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For sure! :) It's German. The "th" is pronounced like a pure "t" but I think the "oe" is difficult to pronounce for English speakers. What comes closest could perhaps be the sound of the "o" in "word" or the "i" in "Sir" but that's still not completely what it sounds like.
 
  • #7
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Any chance i can hijack and get a Noether? =]
And please don't stress the rrrrr as many Amerrrricans tend to do :smile:
 
  • #8
fluidistic
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Lebesgue is a French name. According to wikipedia it is prononced [ləˈbɛg]. So it is not "le-BECK" as stated here, but rather "Le beg". Here the first "e" doesn't have a good equivalent in the English language while the second "e" is almost pronounced as when you read "beg".
For a French speaker, it is pronounced as if there were no "s".
 
  • #9
quasar987
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I am a native french speaker and I agree with everything in fluidistic's post.

How about Pontryagin (also spelled Pontrjagin) huh?
 
  • #10
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How about Pontryagin (also spelled Pontrjagin)?
Simply: Pontr ya gin (with a bit of a rolling r if you can manage)
 
  • #11
quasar987
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I had never looked at it that way. I was stubornly trying Pon try agin, which in french sounds even worst than english.
 
  • #12
turbo
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Lebesgue is a French name. According to wikipedia it is prononced [ləˈbɛg]. So it is not "le-BECK" as stated here, but rather "Le beg". Here the first "e" doesn't have a good equivalent in the English language while the second "e" is almost pronounced as when you read "beg".
For a French speaker, it is pronounced as if there were no "s".
Maybe in France, things are different. Here in Maine we have a huge population of French-Canadian transplants, and the "le" is not accented. Lebesque is pronounced le BECK and Levesque is pronounced le VECK. The "e" in "le" is very short and is practically rolled over.

You should hear what people do to my mother's maiden name (Dionne) and her uncle's family name (Paradis). It's painful.
 
  • #13
dvs
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turbo-1, that's a 'g' in Lebesgue, not a 'q'!

--

I've always wondered about the pronunciation of Urysohn. My Ukranian friend pronounces it "Uri-shown", whereas just about everyone else pronounces it "Uri-son". Any ruskis around to comment?
 
  • #14
turbo
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turbo-1, that's a 'g' in Lebesgue, not a 'q'!

--

I've always wondered about the pronunciation of Urysohn. My Ukranian friend pronounces it "Uri-shown", whereas just about everyone else pronounces it "Uri-son". Any ruskis around to comment?
Thanks, thought it was a typo in the OP. There are a LOT of French names here that end in "esque"
 
  • #15
fluidistic
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Maybe in France, things are different. Here in Maine we have a huge population of French-Canadian transplants, and the "le" is not accented. Lebesque is pronounced le BECK and Levesque is pronounced le VECK. The "e" in "le" is very short and is practically rolled over.

You should hear what people do to my mother's maiden name (Dionne) and her uncle's family name (Paradis). It's painful.
Hey turbo, basically I was saying that it is pronounced with a final "EG" and not "ECK". It seems you made a typo as dvs showed.
I'm from Québec (but lived also a big part of my life in France) so I can imagine the French influence in Maine. By the way I've an Irish name so you can imagine how French and Argentine people pronounce my name.
 
  • #16
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For sure! :) It's German. The "th" is pronounced like a pure "t" but I think the "oe" is difficult to pronounce for English speakers. What comes closest could perhaps be the sound of the "o" in "word" or the "i" in "Sir" but that's still not completely what it sounds like.
I will add the "oe" should pronounced as in Goering. It is pronounced just as "e" is pronounced in French, for example in "Le".
 
  • #17
turbo
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Hey turbo, basically I was saying that it is pronounced with a final "EG" and not "ECK". It seems you made a typo as dvs showed.
I'm from Québec (but lived also a big part of my life in France) so I can imagine the French influence in Maine. By the way I've an Irish name so you can imagine how French and Argentine people pronounce my name.
I went to school with a girl whose last name was "Pelky". Her father couldn't speak or write English when he came to Maine, and the idiot who was setting up payroll, SS records, etc didn't bother to consult a French-speaking person to ask how to spell "Pelletier".
 
  • #18
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Hmmm, I was listening to a math major talk about his experiences at uni last week and he mentioned Lebesgue integration. He pronounced it La beg, where beg sounds like bagel without the el. Excuse my poor and possibly ludicrous explanation.
 

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