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Hubble Law, integral

  1. Jun 13, 2015 #1
    Dear PF Forum,
    I know this is a very basic, basic question. But I'd like to refresh my memory.
    In Hubble Law.
    ##V = H_0 \, D##
    ##H_0## is Hubble constant, aproximately ##\frac{1}{3.1E17t}##
    Okayy, let's say we alter those number to an easier number.
    For every 10 metres, the velocity adds 1 m/s.
    This is how we write, ok?
    ##V = 0.1\, D##
    And now this.
    If an object 1000 metres from us, speeding 100m/s, of course. What time does it takes to reach 4000 metres from us?
    Time is Distance / Speed.
    What is the formula?
    Is this correct?
    ##\int_a^b \frac{H_0}{x}dx, a = 1000, b = 4000##
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jun 14, 2015 #2
    ##V=dx/dt## then ##dt=dx/V## then integrate it ##V=HD## İnside the integral will be ##1/H_0xdx##
     
    Last edited: Jun 14, 2015
  4. Jun 14, 2015 #3
    Ahh, of course H0 is the divider, how careless I am!
    Thanks.
     
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