Hurricane Florence (and Michael) Reports

  • Thread starter Greg Bernhardt
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In summary: I'm getting too wordy. In summary, stay safe PFers in the area. Reports are the outer bands have just hit NC and there is already flooding.
  • #1
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Stay safe PFers in the area. We know there are many of you. Reports are the outer bands have just hit NC and there is already flooding.
https://weather.com/
 
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  • #2
Track the storm(s) - https://www.nhc.noaa.gov/

SUMMARY OF 1100 AM EDT...1500 UTC...INFORMATION
-----------------------------------------------
LOCATION...33.4N 75.5W
ABOUT 145 MI...230 KM ESE OF WILMINGTON NORTH CAROLINA
ABOUT 195 MI...315 KM E OF MYRTLE BEACH SOUTH CAROLINA
MAXIMUM SUSTAINED WINDS...105 MPH...165 KM/H
PRESENT MOVEMENT...NW OR 315 DEGREES AT 10 MPH...17 KM/H
MINIMUM CENTRAL PRESSURE...955 MB...28.20 INCHES

I have friends and colleagues in the Wilmington and Cape Fear area. Some family members are further west in Charlotte. Like so many, I'm waiting and watching.
 
  • #4
Here in upstate (northwest) SC it's mostly sunny right now, and is supposed to stay that way today, with breezes. Tomorrow (Saturday), the wind is supposed to pick up, and rain will start late in the day. Sunday will be the big day here: 30-35 mph winds with higher gusts, and 6-8 inches of rain. Not nearly as bad as on the coast, of course. We'll probably have some falling trees and power outages.

In this town we shouldn't have major flooding because there are no rivers or extreme terrain. We're on a low ridge between watersheds, and all the streams flow away from town. One of them runs behind the houses on the other side of our street, and our house is about 20-25 feet above it.

The college down the street where I used to work has canceled classes for today and Monday. I think it's mainly because many students are from storm-affected areas and want to be able to go home to help out. Administrative and service staff are still supposed to come to work if they can do so safely.
 
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  • #5
Just got back from my morning walk. Cloudy, cool, breezy with occasional gusts, occasional very light sprinkles of rain, not worth opening the umbrella for. We must have had some stronger gusts overnight, which left some leaves, twigs and small branches on the ground.
 
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  • #6
jtbell said:
Here in upstate (northwest) SC it's mostly sunny right now, and is supposed to stay that way today, with breezes. Tomorrow (Saturday), the wind is supposed to pick up, and rain will start late in the day.
SUMMARY OF 1100 AM EDT...1500 UTC...INFORMATION
-----------------------------------------------
LOCATION...33.6N 79.6W
ABOUT 40 MI...65 KM W OF MYRTLE BEACH SOUTH CAROLINA
ABOUT 40 MI...65 KM S OF FLORENCE SOUTH CAROLINA
MAXIMUM SUSTAINED WINDS...45 MPH...75 KM/H
PRESENT MOVEMENT...W OR 270 DEGREES AT 2 MPH...4 KM/H
MINIMUM CENTRAL PRESSURE...995 MB...29.38 INCHESIt looks like the center of the storm will move into NW SC by 8 am tomorrow and pass slowly through the region, then up through the NC/TN border on Sunday, along the Appalachian range WV, eastern KY by Monday, OH river valley, through PA and S NY (Tuesday) into New England through Wednesday. Lots of rain and flooding along the way for the next several days.

Meanwhile, Storm Helene will likely become an extra-tropical storm or cyclone this weekend or early next week. It is predicted to travel through Ireland and Scotland during Monday/Tuesday..
https://www.nhc.noaa.gov/mobile/refresh/MIATCDAT3+html/MIATCDAT3_151435.html
 
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  • #7
Checking in from Durham NC. Looks like we escape the worst of the weather. A few bursts of torrential rain amidst periodic showers. Some gusty winds but nothing that sustained. Power went out for about an hour and a half last afternoon/evening, but came back on... probably just a blown transformer.

Took a bike ride out this afternoon. Wet, yucky and a lot of tree branches and like debris, but nothing too tragic looking. Seems we just got scraped by the edge of the storm, but lots of rain to come over the next few days.

diogenesNY
 
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  • #8
It looks like we dodged the bullet, too. The center of the tropical depression passed over us around 8 AM, more or less. We've had a fairly steady light rain with gusty breezes since early yesterday afternoon, but I've seen no major downpours. There are small puddles of water on the street outside. We haven't lost electricity in our neighborhood, don't know about other areas around here yet. Most of the action in upstate SC seems to be northeast of the I-26 corridor, up towards Charlotte.

However, southeast NC is still getting a lot of rain, with moisture still streaming in from the Atlantic. The news reports from Wilmington, New Bern and Jacksonville are pretty alarming. Rivers are still rising. Further inland, Fayetteville (IIRC) has ordered evacuations from within a mile of its river(s).
 
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  • #9
upload_2018-9-16_11-57-55.png


From, http://www.intellicast.com/National/Precipitation/Weekly.aspx?location=USVA0659
 

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  • #10
Waiting patiently for any rain to start in the DC metro area, looks like we will get some later tonight thru Monday. As for amounts, it is hovering in the 1 inch total for the event as opposed to the 8-10 inches predicted early last week.
 
  • #12
Looks like we dodged a bullet again. The center of the remnants of Hurricane Michael passed west of Columbia SC and east of us this morning. Most of the rain is on the east side of the storm, i.e. the opposite side from us, from Columbia towards the coast. We got a good soaking rain overnight and early this morning. Now it's mostly stopped, or maybe just paused. Not too much wind, as far as I can tell. The sun is supposed to come out by evening.

Most or all of the schools in the area, including the college, closed as a precaution. That's a third day off, after two days for Florence.

It's amazing how much faster all this has been happening, compared to Florence.
 
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1. What is Hurricane Florence (and Michael) and how do they form?

Hurricane Florence and Michael are both powerful tropical storms that originate in the Atlantic Ocean. They are formed when warm water from the ocean evaporates and rises, creating low pressure in the atmosphere. As the warm air rises, it cools and condenses, forming clouds and thunderstorms. As these storms continue to develop and strengthen, they can become hurricanes.

2. What are the potential impacts of Hurricane Florence (and Michael)?

Hurricane Florence and Michael can bring a range of destructive impacts, including strong winds, heavy rainfall, and storm surge. These can cause damage to buildings and infrastructure, flooding, and power outages. In addition, these hurricanes can also spawn tornadoes and create dangerous rip currents along the coast.

3. How are hurricanes like Florence (and Michael) tracked and monitored?

Hurricanes are monitored using a variety of tools, including satellites, radar, and aircraft. These instruments provide data on the storm's location, movement, and strength. This information is then used to create forecasts and track the path of the hurricane, allowing for warnings and preparations to be made in affected areas.

4. What are the categories of hurricanes and how are they classified?

Hurricanes are classified using the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale, which categorizes storms based on their maximum sustained wind speeds. The categories range from 1 to 5, with Category 5 being the most severe. This scale also takes into account potential storm surge and damage to structures.

5. How can individuals and communities prepare for Hurricane Florence (and Michael)?

There are several steps that individuals and communities can take to prepare for a hurricane. These include creating an emergency preparedness plan, securing loose items around the home, stocking up on supplies, and staying informed about the storm's progress. It is also important to follow any evacuation orders or other instructions from local authorities to ensure safety.

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