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Hybridization states of the 8 orbitals (*) of Xe and Os

  1. May 25, 2010 #1

    dextercioby

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    Dear all,

    can you point me to a book reference where the hybridization states of the 8 orbitals (*) of Xe and Os in these 2 compounds [itex] \mbox{XeF_{8}} [/itex] and [itex] \mbox{OsF_{8}} [/itex] are justified in agreement with the quantum theory?

    Do these 16 bonds involve the "f" orbitals or not ?

    Thank you

    Added(*): 8 <valence shell electrons>.
     
    Last edited: May 26, 2010
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  3. May 25, 2010 #2

    alxm

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    Re: Hybridization

    This post makes little sense to me.
    Quantum theory is not at odds with valence-bond theory; the latter is derived from the former. These compounds have a lot more than 8 orbitals. XeF8 is not a stable compound (XeF6 is) and I don't know that OsF8 has been observed in practice either.

    Anyway, in classical VBT, the osmium compound would probably have f-hybrid orbitals involved directly, but not xenon hexafluoride.

    Shaik's book on modern valence-bond theory is the best on the topic.
     
  4. May 26, 2010 #3

    dextercioby

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    Re: Hybridization

    At the first glance http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Xenon#Halides seems pretty ok. The whole article seems pretty ok.

    So let's choose the part here

    <The xenon fluorides behave as both fluoride acceptors and fluoride donors, forming salts that contain such cations as XeF+ and Xe2F3+, and anions such as XeF5−, XeF7−, and XeF82−>.

    Can the bonds in the last ion be justified by hybridization theory ? I'm thinking f2sp3d2 ?

    Ok, the wiki page on Os doen't mention the F_8 compound, but what about the F_7 ? Should't that be fsp3d2 ?
     
    Last edited: May 26, 2010
  5. May 26, 2010 #4

    DrDu

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    Re: Hybridization

    In main group compounds, neither d nor f orbitals contribute to bonding or hybridization.
    For a modern valence bond description see e.g.:

    http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S1380-7323(99)80022-3 [Broken]
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 4, 2017
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