Hypervalent Oxygen: Violating Rules & Reactions

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In summary, the conversation discusses the possibility of 2 H2O molecules gaining and losing electrons, resulting in the formation of ionic water. This causes one oxygen atom to become hypervalent, with 9 electrons, while the other has only 7. It is noted that this is not a stable form of water and goes against the general rule that hypervalency starts in the 3rd period, not group 16 of the 2nd period. However, it is mentioned that this idea is now considered a myth and can occur under certain conditions. The speaker also expresses doubt about the feasibility of this reaction in the gas phase and notes that H2O- does not exist in solution, but rather a solvated electron
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I know that it is possible for 2 H2O molecules to gain and lose electrons. This reaction looks like this:

2 H2O -> H2O+ + H2O-

This causes 1 of the oxygen atoms to be hypervalent since it now has 9 electrons. The other oxygen has only 7 electrons. The electron on the hypervalent oxygen came from 1 of the other oxygen's lone pairs.

Obviously this ionic water is not stable.

But how is this ionic water possible when it violates 1 of the general rules in chemistry which is that hypervalency starts in the 3rd period not group 16 of the 2nd period.
 
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Is this really true ? Because I have never seen anything like this, rather i have seen this
2H2O = H3O+ + OH-
Pls. Read the equal to as a reversible arrow.
 
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Yes under certain conditions H2O+ and H2O- can form
 
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Hypervalency not being possible in 2nd row elements is nowadays known to be a fairy tale, which nevertheless is going on to get told to high school students.
Nevertheless, I don't think that this reaction happens. In gas phase, H2O- is only marginally stable. The electron is bound by the dipole moment of the water molecule and is spread out over a large area. It does not resemble a valence electron at all. On the other hand, it cost's a lot of energy to ionize H2O to H2O+, so this reaction is not feasible in the gas phase.
In solution, H2O- doesn't exist. Rather, there exist a solvated electron for a short time, which rapidly reacts under the formation of H2 and OH-. Again, energetics isn't favourable.
 

Related to Hypervalent Oxygen: Violating Rules & Reactions

1. What is hypervalent oxygen?

Hypervalent oxygen is an oxygen atom that has more than its typical number of valence electrons, which is usually six. This means that the oxygen atom is able to form more than the usual number of bonds with other atoms.

2. How does hypervalent oxygen violate the octet rule?

The octet rule states that atoms tend to combine in such a way that they each have eight electrons in their valence shell. However, hypervalent oxygen violates this rule by having more than eight electrons in its valence shell.

3. What are the most common reactions involving hypervalent oxygen?

The most common reactions involving hypervalent oxygen are the formation of hypervalent compounds, such as peroxides and superoxides, and the cleavage of these compounds to form oxygen free radicals.

4. How is hypervalent oxygen used in organic synthesis?

Hypervalent oxygen compounds, such as peroxides, are often used as oxidizing agents in organic synthesis reactions. They are also used as leaving groups in substitution reactions.

5. What are the potential hazards of working with hypervalent oxygen?

Hypervalent oxygen compounds can be highly reactive and unstable, which can pose a hazard to those working with them. They can also release oxygen free radicals, which can be damaging to living cells. It is important to handle these compounds with care and follow proper safety protocols.

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