I am 27 with a systems engineering and interested in physics

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I have been working about 4 years in the same company and got my engineering like 2 years ago, I am a good engineer but around 3 or 4 years ago I became very interested in physics and astrophysics. Maybe getting a BS in Germany because there is not very expensive, I am from Ecuador and I can get a government scholarship so I don't think money would be a problem.

What do you thing about this, can you give me some advice or tell me your story if you went through something similar?
 

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  • #2
OldEngr63
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To what end? What do you want to do if you do get a BS in physics? Is this just for personal enjoyment, or do you want to work in some aspect of physics?

If you have a good job and some experience, think twice before you discard that to start over in an area where jobs may well be few and far between.
 
  • #3
DEvens
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If you want to go into industry, then go to your local university library and get the physics magazines like Physics Today or whatever they are lately called. Get the issues that show recent graduates and where they got jobs. You can Google this, or your university librarian will be able to help you. Look at those jobs. If they look attractive, then it's a possible place to get a degree. If those jobs look boring or worse, keep reading until something does catch your eye.

Consider whether you could get the job you want with the degree you already have. Many of the skills in the two degrees are similar. Many jobs will require "a BSc in science or engineering" but will not specify as closely as physics. For example, computer programming is required for both. A lot of the math is the same in both.

If you want to go into academia it is a very different story. Be sure you are "in love" with the subject before you pursue that. It should not be just a hobby, but a passion. It should be something you would do massive amounts in your own time without prompting. Are you spending 20 hours per week on physics already? Maybe academia is for you. Spending 2 hours per week on it? Probably not. Still the advice is the same. See where recent graduates got positions, and see which ones you might enjoy.
 
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OldEngr63
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DEvens comment is good advice, particularly the part about the dedication required for academia.
 

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