I'm in a talent show tomorrow. Show me a cool math proof.

  • Thread starter Jamin2112
  • Start date
  • #1
Jamin2112
986
9
I thought about doing a proof of the Pythagorean Theorem, a proof that the harmonic series is unbounded, a proof that e^π > π^e, a proof that e^(b*i) = cos(b) + i*sin(b), a proof that √2 is irrational, but honestly, none of those are cool enough.

Please show me a cool proof that an ordinary audience could understand.
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
camilus
146
0
Maybe a proof of Euclid's theorem of the infinitude of primes, or a proof of Euler's identity..?
 
  • #3
chiro
Science Advisor
4,797
133
Monty Hall Problem - its not intuitive and a lot of people (even including statisticians) can doubt the results even due to its counter intuitiveness
 
  • #4
Jamin2112
986
9
Monty Hall Problem - its not intuitive and a lot of people (even including statisticians) can doubt the results even due to its counter intuitiveness

hmmmm .... the only problem with the Monty Hall Problem is that the setup is hard to explain. You have to explain to rules of the game 4 or 5 times before the audience understands how it works.
 
  • #5
chiro
Science Advisor
4,797
133
hmmmm .... the only problem with the Monty Hall Problem is that the setup is hard to explain. You have to explain to rules of the game 4 or 5 times before the audience understands how it works.

What kind of audience are you speaking to?
 
  • #6
Dickfore
2,981
5
 
Last edited by a moderator:
  • #7
mxbob468
49
0
Last edited by a moderator:
  • #8
mathwonk
Science Advisor
Homework Helper
11,345
1,577
describe 4 dimensional spheres?
 
  • #9
Dickfore
2,981
5
  • #10
TylerH
724
0
A simple Diophantine equation? a^b=b^a is fun, and pretty easy to understand. It also has the attribute of not being part of any curriculum, so even the advanced audience members won't know the answer until you prove it. (unless they are fast)
 
  • #11
mxbob468
49
0
A simple Diophantine equation? a^b=b^a is fun, and pretty easy to understand. It also has the attribute of not being part of any curriculum, so even the advanced audience members won't know the answer until you prove it. (unless they are fast)

is there someway to solve this algorithmically? without just seeing that it's 2 and 4?
 
  • #13
Landau
Science Advisor
905
0
How does reproducing a proof given by someone on this forum show that you have talent? I mean, doesn't this defeat the purpose of a talent show?
 
  • #14
Dickfore
2,981
5
How does reproducing a proof given by someone on this forum show that you have talent? I mean, doesn't this defeat the purpose of a talent show?

> Implying that talent and originality are the same thing.
 
  • #15
LCKurtz
Science Advisor
Homework Helper
Insights Author
Gold Member
9,559
774
You could entertain them with non-proofs of true theorems. One of my favorites is the "long division" method proving the remainder of a polynomial p(x) upon division by (x - a ) is p(a)

Proof
Code:
         p
      _______________
(x-a)/  p(x)
        p(x) - p(a)
           __________

                p(a)
 

Suggested for: I'm in a talent show tomorrow. Show me a cool math proof.

  • Last Post
Replies
12
Views
3K
Replies
8
Views
3K
Replies
3
Views
1K
  • Last Post
Replies
15
Views
20K
  • Last Post
Replies
9
Views
6K
Replies
1
Views
632
  • Last Post
Replies
3
Views
2K
  • Last Post
Replies
14
Views
4K
Replies
13
Views
4K
  • Last Post
Replies
6
Views
1K
Top