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Important and Legal Responsibility of Working Safely

  1. Feb 11, 2010 #1
    Hello,

    Could someone please elaborate and possibly, be specific about the Importannce and Legal Responsibility of Working Safely in a lab are?

    Also, could you please explain to me the importance of working accurately and how accuracy can be ensured in the techniques used.

    My above questions are substantially relevant to the Chemistry side of things.

    I just need to know a little more and hopefully you have the information.

    Thanks!
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 11, 2010 #2
    Possibly in a higher level school to be precise.
     
  4. Feb 11, 2010 #3
    I have this so far:

    Working accurately in an experiment provides the following advantages:

    1. Greatly decreases the chance of error in an experiment
    2. Provides greater opportunity of producing the same expected results
    3. Knowledge can only be gained from proven and accurate results

    But could you please explain both of my questions in further detail?

    Thanks again.
     
  5. Feb 11, 2010 #4

    russ_watters

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    Sounds like you want us to write a paper for you...
     
  6. Feb 11, 2010 #5
    Sorry? Did I say that? I am quite capable of doing my own work thank you very much, heh..

    All I am asking for is some views on importancy and legal responsibility of working safely.

    Also some description on working accurately and how accuracy can be ensured in the techniques used...is there a problem?
     
  7. Feb 11, 2010 #6
    Does anyone know any information?

    Thanks!
     
  8. Feb 11, 2010 #7

    berkeman

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    Well, I googled your thread title, and got some good hits (the first hit is your thread here, obviously). I refined the search a bit by adding +Chemistry after your thread title, and got a better hit list:

    http://www.google.com/search?source...l+Responsibility+of+Working+Safely++chemistry

    There should be some good information in there for your paper.
     
  9. Feb 11, 2010 #8
    Which one of those links would you think are most useful?
     
  10. Feb 11, 2010 #9
    Why not chech each one out for yourself? After all, you know best what you are looking for.
     
  11. Feb 11, 2010 #10
    Nvm, worked it out myself anyway. Don't need no references nor help from you people..what's the point in the forum if you're not going to help? If you guys don't know the answer, then admit it..everyones not perfect, I have already acknowledged that, ehehe..
     
  12. Feb 11, 2010 #11

    berkeman

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    Because if you get spoon-fed the answers, and don't learn how to figrure things our for yourself, then we really haven't helped you. That's why we have a Homework Help Template in the HH forums, for example. To make it clear to students that they should be doing the research and attempting the problem, not just looking for answers from a web forum.
     
  13. Feb 11, 2010 #12

    berkeman

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  14. Feb 11, 2010 #13

    Borek

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    Actually berkeman helped you enormously. You have worked it out.
     
  15. Feb 12, 2010 #14

    chemisttree

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    I would have to agree with Borek. Berkeman did your Google search for you and even refined it!

    I'd be a bit embarrassed to complain about it...
     
    Last edited: Feb 12, 2010
  16. Feb 12, 2010 #15
    Err..but I used none of the links he provided and therefore, didn't help me .. :\
     
  17. Feb 12, 2010 #16

    Borek

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    Yes he did. He nudged you in the direction of actually starting the work.
     
  18. Feb 12, 2010 #17

    berkeman

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    It doesn't matter whether I helped you or not. The good news is that you did it on your own, which is what matters in our professions. We all need to learn how to do the best job we can, and that usually involves a lot of self-motivation and research on our own, and then maybe asking for some help from others.

    When I was relatively new at the company where I've been for a long time now, I ended up having to ask very experienced engineers questions in order to figure out problems that I was running into in my own designs, or to figure out pretty complex support questions coming in from customers. I still remember one time that I approached a very senior (extremely bright, but somewhat offish) software engineer with a question... He said to me, "I'll answer your question this time straight-away, but in the future, I expect you to have done your homework before you ask me a question. Look in the KDB, search through the support database, check the databook and app notes for relevant information, and read through any applicable EPRs (engineering problem reports). Often, that will answer the problem anyway. But if that reading doesn't answer the question, I'm happy to address it, and provide some tutorial thoughts about the issue at that point."

    Kind of an arrogant stance, eh? But you know what? He was 100% right. That helped me to learn how to learn, and to understand that people's time is valuable. Do some research on your own time first, and then if you aren't able to figure something out, go ahead and ask for help from folks who have a lot more experience in the field. That's good for both of you -- you learn more and maybe figure it out on your own, and it keeps the questions to the more experienced person (by you and dozens of others) much more efficient and on-point.
     
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