Inelastic Collision Derivation Help

In summary, the conversation is about the derivation of a system of equations involving conservation of momentum and coefficient of restitution. The first equation is derived by multiplying the second equation by the mass of the second object and adding it to the first equation. The conversation also mentions the need for perseverance and having the skill to solve linear equations.
  • #1
GreenSabbath
17
0
http://upload.wikimedia.org/math/5/c/b/5cbdceba601a68315f744dc1c06e9ba7.png"
How wxactly has this equation be derived?

http://upload.wikimedia.org/math/3/c/5/3c53f3d1c66725053decc7e3e546c32d.png"
Can someone help me with the derivation. I can't trace the orgin of the second part od the systems of equation.

Help needed urgently Thanks
 
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  • #2
Not clear what your question is. Those two equations in your second link:
(1) Looks like conservation of momentum (OK)
(2) Looks like "c" is the coefficient of restitution (not quite right)

You'll have to fix the second equation. It should read:
[tex]V_{1f} - V_{2f} = c(V_2 - V_1)[/tex]

Then, to combine those equations to get the equation in your first link: multiply the 2nd equation by M2 and add it to the first equation. Isolate V1f.
 
  • #3
You derive it by perseverance.
Solve the linear system of equations you are supposed to solve.

If you don't have the skill to solve a system of linear equations, that is what you should focus on.

If you can't be bothered to perform the operations yourself, there is no reason for us to help you out, is there?
 

Related to Inelastic Collision Derivation Help

What is an inelastic collision?

An inelastic collision is a type of collision in which the total kinetic energy of the system is not conserved. This means that some of the kinetic energy is lost to other forms of energy, such as heat or sound.

How is the final velocity calculated in an inelastic collision?

The final velocity in an inelastic collision can be calculated using the equation: Vf = (m1v1 + m2v2) / (m1 + m2), where m1 and v1 are the mass and initial velocity of one object, and m2 and v2 are the mass and initial velocity of the other object.

What is the coefficient of restitution in an inelastic collision?

The coefficient of restitution is a measure of the elasticity of a collision. In an inelastic collision, the coefficient of restitution is less than 1, indicating that the objects do not bounce off each other with the same amount of energy as before the collision.

What are some real-life examples of inelastic collisions?

Some examples of inelastic collisions include a car crashing into a wall, a basketball hitting the ground and not bouncing back to its original height, and a ball of clay hitting a hard surface and sticking to it.

How are inelastic collisions different from elastic collisions?

In an elastic collision, the total kinetic energy of the system is conserved. This means that the objects bounce off each other with the same amount of energy as before the collision. In contrast, in an inelastic collision, some of the kinetic energy is lost to other forms of energy, making the objects stick together or move with a reduced velocity after the collision.

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