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Inflationary Cosmologys effects on the strong nuclear force

  1. Nov 1, 2013 #1
    Not sure if this is a cosmology or standard model question , but here it goes. If the repelling force caused by inflationary cosmology were strong enough (perhaps down the line a few hundred quadrillion years from now or so) to begin to create space in between quarks, will the strong nuclear force cause extra gluons and particles of matter to spawn, and cause a chain reaction among those newly created particles leading to an infinite amount of matter creation? My understanding of the strong force is that the further away something is, the stronger the strong nuclear force is, which is how when quarks are pulled away from each other, they spawn new quarks to bond with the pulled apart quarks to make new protons/neutrons. If a never ending force were applied to this, wouldn't that cause a never ending creation of quarks, and could inflationary cosmology create this force eventually?
     
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  3. Nov 1, 2013 #2

    UltrafastPED

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    The expansion of space is completely negligible at the local level; and what there is simply consists of ... more space! So any force of any immediate consequence will never notice it.

    For homework you could try working out the effect of a gravitational wave from closely orbiting neutron starts - perhaps on a Rydberg atom. For starters look at the sensitivity of the LIGO system.
     
  4. Nov 1, 2013 #3
    I was wondering, what if the dark matter is nothing but the particles that pop in and out existence inside the larger particles or just about anywhere?
     
  5. Nov 1, 2013 #4

    UltrafastPED

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    Dark matter doesn't need to exist where "visible matter" is present; they are independent of each other ... so this proposal has to be rejected.

    The current "most likely" theory is that dark matter consists of weakly interacting massive particles "WIMP"s.

    See recent news from LUX: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Large_Underground_Xenon_Detector
     
  6. Nov 1, 2013 #5
    I'll check that out, and I was wondering if the expansion of space would remain negligible eons from now, when the expansion of space is many magnitudes greater than it is today?
     
  7. Nov 1, 2013 #6
    Thanks for the link, what I am thinking along is, WIMPS may also be made up dark matter, dark matter, if it can be in the space between quarks, it could as well be everywhere else too.

    Is it probable in that case that dark matter is what that gives rise to the observable particles?
     
  8. Nov 1, 2013 #7

    UltrafastPED

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    They think that the WIMPs _are_ the dark matter. Dark matter is simply matter that is not detectable by ordinary astronomical means .... it is all deduced through gravitational studies. There have been lots of ideas which have been tested and rejected since it was first discovered ~1933 - 80 years ago.

    The expansion of space has had an effect on the light that originated about 300,000 years after the Big Bang - when the plasma cooled enough to decouple light from matter - we have very good estimates for the temperature at that event, which provides the statistical distribution of wavelengths. This light is the cosmic background radiation which is measured today as 2.7 K - this corresponds to an increase in wavelength for each photon (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cosmic_microwave_background). But this increase occurred over the full 13 billion years, a stretch by tiny stretch as space expanded.

    Weinberg's book "The First Three Minutes" discusses this, and may do the calculations in the appendix.
     
  9. Nov 1, 2013 #8
    Yes, I completely agree with you, I am speculating as it is quite obvious, but I would like to see if my guess holds when I attempt to apply math to it. Thank you
     
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