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Info on soundwaves and overtones

  1. Jan 1, 2009 #1
    hallo all,

    while reading some info on soundwaves and overtones I found the following statement on wikipedia:
    "The first overtone is the first allowed harmonic above the fundamental frequency (F1).

    In the case of a system with two different ends (as in the case of a tube open at one end), the closed end is a node and the open end is an antinode. The first resonant frequency has only a quarter of a wave in the tube. This means that the first harmonic is characterized by a wavelength four times the length of the tube."

    now I want to know why it is like this:
    The first resonant frequency has only a quarter of a wave in the tube. This means that the first harmonic is characterized by a wavelength four times the length of the tube.

    Why the 4 ?

    how do they get that?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jan 1, 2009 #2

    tiny-tim

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    happy new year!

    Hallo djef! :wink:

    The wave has to go up :rolleyes:, come back, go down :frown:, and come back, to do one wavelength.

    For a tube closed at one end, the wave only has time to go up :rolleyes:

    that's 1/4 of the wavelength. :smile:
     
  4. Jan 2, 2009 #3
    Re: overtones

    oh yes, indeed, thanks a lot tiny-tim
     
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