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Initial Amplitude and the Release Point

  1. Dec 6, 2005 #1
    Question:

    "A pendulum with a length of 2.82m is released from an initial angle of 17.5 degrees. After 1100s, its amplitude has been reduced by friction to 5.30 degrees. What is the value of b/2m?"

    Word Done:

    A = A(initial)e^(-betaT)

    Basically I have done the problem on the basis that A(initial) is equal to 17.5 degrees. I just wanted to make sure that the initial amplitude is actually the release point? Or is there a way to find it.

    For anyone that would like to check my answer was:

    Beta = 3.28x10^-4
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Dec 6, 2005 #2

    Integral

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    Staff Emeritus
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    Gold Member

    As long as the initial velocity is 0, the release point is the initial amplitude.
     
  4. Dec 7, 2005 #3
    Thank you for your quick response ^_^, that means I should have the right answer as is.
     
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