Is it too late to pursue a physics degree after a lackluster high school career?

In summary, this person wants to study physics but has a background in engineering and lacks the math and science knowledge required for a physics degree. They advise starting with math classes and if that is not a good fit, seeking out a physics degree at a later date.
  • #1
mcgeehe
1
0
I want to study physics but...

Here's my story as brief as possible.

I hated school until I graduated from HS never got "good" grades and never pushed myself what so ever. I did try community college out of HS but quit for various reasons.

Fast forward to the present. I'm 25 and planning on returning to college this fall. Recently physics has really been interesting me and I've considered studying it but it seems so daunting given my back ground.

I feel that I'm good with math and science but like I said before, I never cared until now, we are talking the highest level of science I went through in HS was physical science and biology and math was only up to algebra.

So what I want to know is, what can I do? Is it too late for me to start down this road? Will my horrible HS career hold me back? I'm at a major fork in the road and I know I need to choose a path but just don't know what to do. I also think maybe I should just learn a trade or something, i dunno.

Also, don't be afraid to be right up front, I will not be offended or hurt, but please don't be rude for the sake of being rude.
 
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  • #2


I think that if it really does interrest you then you should give it a go,
I had a similar story, as I wanted to do IT for a long time but in the last 3 years of my high school time I started loving physics more and more.
To such an extent that I decided to study it.

Now I'm halfway my first year and have not a single regret yet :P
 
  • #3


I see no reason you can't dive right in.

Sometimes, particularly if you have a day job and some responsibilities (kids, mortgage, etc.), it's a good idea to start slow. Take a single night school class in physics if that's an option and that will allow you to evaluate for yourself how much work doing a full degree is going to be and what the experience will be like.

Otherwise, if you're in a position to dedicate several years to being a full-time student, you can dive right in. First year physics programs tend to have a fairly broad curriculum and so if it turns out that physics isn't your thing, you will be in a good position to switch to a degree in engineering or one of the other sciences.
 
  • #4


You absolutely can do it! I'd advise you to start with math classes, it's great for getting your brain back into problem-solving mode. But don't try to rush in and take a class beyond your reach. The college probably has a placement test - take it, and start where it says to start.

Good luck!
 
  • #5


I'm 32, and I just went back for a degree in electrical engineering last year. Oh, and I dropped out of high school when I was fifteen and never even learned algebra.

Go for it. Your still young, and you only live once.
 
  • #6


I also dropped out of high school. I went back for physics in my mid-twenties. It went good, got good grades and got my degree. But I kinda of wish I would have done a trade because as much as I like the personal growth and philosophic knowledge that the physics degree provides, I would also love to have an employable trade skill right now.
 
  • #7


I am in the same situation my friend. Never got good grades in HS but did graduate. Spent 7 years in the Army. Trying the helicopter pilot road but have decided that it is not for me. Now am just about to make a decision on switching to an engineering degree. I am really interested in Coastal Engineering but nervous given my lack of experience in math and physics. Currently enrolled in a community college and am only in intermediate algebra. I'm 27 and I'm sure we are feeling the same thing.
 

1. Why should I study physics?

Studying physics can provide you with a deep understanding of the natural world and how it works. It can also open up many career opportunities in fields such as engineering, research, and technology.

2. What skills do I need to study physics?

To study physics, you should have a strong foundation in mathematics and problem-solving skills. You should also be curious, analytical, and have a passion for understanding the world around you.

3. Is physics a difficult subject to study?

Physics can be challenging, but with dedication and hard work, it is achievable. It requires a lot of critical thinking and problem-solving, but the satisfaction of understanding complex concepts and solving difficult problems makes it worth it.

4. What career options are available for physics graduates?

Physics graduates can pursue a variety of careers, including research and development, engineering, data analysis, teaching, and many more. The problem-solving and analytical skills gained from studying physics are highly valued in many industries.

5. Can I study physics without having a background in science?

While having a background in science can be helpful, it is not a requirement to study physics. With dedication and hard work, anyone can learn and understand the fundamental principles of physics.

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