Is sum centrifugal force and centripetal force zero?

In summary: If you use an inertial frame, there won't be inertial forces. The effect of inertia force on a body is to resist motion and maintain a constant velocity. We consider them for balancing machines and minimizing vibrations because these forces can cause unwanted motions and disturbances, leading to inefficiencies and potential problems in the operation of the machine. Therefore, it is important to take them into consideration in order to optimize and improve the performance of the machine. In summary, when balancing rotating mass, we consider the inertia force to be equal and opposite to the centripetal force, which causes the rotation. In the case of reciprocating mass, we also have an inertia force that is equal and opposite to the motion-causing applied force. In a rotating
  • #1
ajayguhan
153
1
While balancing rotating mass we consider the inertia force (centrifugal force) is equal and opposite to centripetal force which causes the rotation.

if both force(applied external force on rotating mass) which causes the motion and force which resist motion (inertia force) are equal and opposite, won't they cancel each other and produce nil effect? if so how is the ball rotating with constant angular velocity

In case of reciprocating mass again we have inertia force which is the mass times the acceleration of reciprocating mass and opposite in direction. if the inertia force and motion causing applied force are equal and opposite, isn't the net force on the body is zero?if not why it is so? and why we consider:
1. inertial force equal and opposite to the external force applied
2. what is the real effect of inertia force on a body?
 
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  • #2
Centrifugal does not exist in a non rotating frame of reference. So you can have centrifugal or centripetal force acting on the ball depending on which frame of reference you choose, rotating or not, but no both together.
 
  • #3
drummin said:
Centrifugal does not exist in a non rotating frame of reference.
The inertial centrifugal force exists only in non rotating frames of reference.

drummin said:
So you can have centrifugal or centripetal force acting on the ball depending on which frame of reference you choose, rotating or not, but no both together.
In the rotating frame you have both of them acting.
 
  • #4
ajayguhan said:
isn't the net force on the body is zero?
Yes, if you choose a rotating frame of reference, where the acceleration of the body is zero, then centripetal and centrifugal force must cancel.

ajayguhan said:
if so how is the ball rotating with constant angular velocity
In the rotating frame where they cancel, the ball is static.
 
  • #5
okay then in case of reciprocating motion, should we consider inertia force only when we choose a reciprocating frame(non inertia frame)?

then what effect does the inertia force has on motions? and why do we consider them for balancing of machines and minimizing the vibration?
 
  • #6
ajayguhan said:
okay then in case of reciprocating motion, should we consider inertia force only when we choose a reciprocating frame(non inertia frame)?

then what effect does the inertia force has on motions? and why do we consider them for balancing of machines and minimizing the vibration?
In physics "inertial forces" usually refers to forces that arise only in non-inertial frames. In engineering the term is sometimes used in quasi static analysis of accelerating parts. For a simple system like your ball, the math of these two approaches is indistinguishable.
 
  • #7
A.T. said:
In physics "inertial forces" usually refers to forces that arise only in non-inertial frames. In engineering the term is sometimes used in quasi static analysis of accelerating parts. For a simple system like your ball, the math of these two approaches is indistinguishable.

we consider inertia force only when we deal with non inertial frame, if so while balancing a machine which has say reciprocating or rotating motion, do we balance it in non inertial frame?
 
  • #8
ajayguhan said:
if so while balancing a machine which has say reciprocating or rotating motion, do we balance it in non inertial frame?
I don't know which frame of reference you use to analyze your machine. If you use a non-inertial frame, there will be inertial forces.
 

Related to Is sum centrifugal force and centripetal force zero?

What is centrifugal force?

Centrifugal force is the apparent force that acts on an object moving in a circular path, pulling it away from the center of rotation.

What is centripetal force?

Centripetal force is the force that acts on an object moving in a circular path, pulling it towards the center of rotation.

Is centrifugal force and centripetal force the same thing?

No, centrifugal force and centripetal force are not the same thing. Centrifugal force is the apparent force experienced by an object in circular motion, while centripetal force is the actual force that keeps an object moving in a circular path.

Is centrifugal force and centripetal force always zero?

No, centrifugal force and centripetal force can have non-zero values depending on the speed and radius of the circular motion. However, in some cases, such as when the object is moving at a constant speed in a perfect circular path, the two forces can cancel out and result in a net force of zero.

How do centrifugal force and centripetal force relate to each other?

Centrifugal force and centripetal force are two components of the same force, known as the centripetal force. Centrifugal force is an inertial force, while centripetal force is a real force. They have equal magnitudes and opposite directions, and together they keep an object moving in a circular path.

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