Is the Diagram in My Geometry Homework Incorrect?

  • Thread starter r0bHadz
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In summary, the conversation discusses the confusion regarding the placement of X' in relation to the line segment between P' and Q'. The homework statement states that X' must lie on this segment, but the attached picture does not accurately reflect this. Additionally, the conversation delves into the concept of mapping under F, where the image of a line segment should also be a line segment. However, the mapping in this case results in a line segment P'X' that is not contained within P'Q'. The attempt at a solution suggests that X' is drawn elsewhere initially, but after calculating distances, it is determined that X' must be on the line P'Q'. The diagram serves as an illustration, but the calculations hold more importance
  • #1
r0bHadz
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Homework Statement


On my attached pic "wtflang2," he says X' must lie on the segment between P' and Q', but the picture is not indicating that. X' seems to be on a segment P'X', not on segment P'Q'.Not only that, but he says d(P,X) and d(P',X') should be equal but his picture does not show this.

Homework Equations

The Attempt at a Solution


[/B]
He says the image of a line segment under F is a line segment. So if PQ is a line segment, and PX is a line segment contained within PQ, I don't understand how the mapping gives us a line segment P'X' that is not contained in line segment P'Q'.

Can anyone help me make sense of this theorem? I am utterly confused by it.
 

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  • wtflang2.png
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  • #2
X' is drawn elsewhere because "at that point in the text" you don't know where it is yet. After calculating the distances you learn that X' has to be on the line P'Q'. You could draw a revised diagram with that new knowledge. The calculations matter, the diagrams are just for illustration.
 
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