Is there a way to appear smarter?

  • Thread starter bor0000
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I'm a 26th level Palladin by knight and an accountant named Ron by day.

Dungeons and Dragons is cool, you people are wierd.:wink:

People will see through someone trying to appear smart, just get some education and learn as much as you can, find some academic interest outside of what your studying, have a few strings to your bow, nothing you do will make you supersmart or even appear so if your not now, but you can at least appear informed or interesting. The older you get the more crap is stuffed in your head, so just growing wiser can fool people into thinking your smart :smile:

As homer says Camus can do but Sartre is smartre, although I disagree because...., saying things like that will make you appear smart, particularly if you have read both and can back that stuff up :smile:
 
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Gokul43201

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bor0000 said:
Is there a way to appear smarter?

a friend is asking...
Yes. Quit the "a friend wants to know" approach!
 
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Schrodinger's Dog said:
As homer says Camus can do but Sartre is smartre,
:rofl: :rofl: :rofl: :biggrin: I love it!
 
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Wait, I got it.

Wear smart shoes and hats.
 
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It's been said but it bears repeating: don't fake smart, try to actually BE smart- reading is fundamental.

As far as the rest.. why would you want to fool someone about that anyhow? Any person who is half intelligent would see through the ruse, and if it's for a girl, she'll only dump you when she realizes it's an act.

Try being yourself. I hear being yourself is "in" nowadays.
 

chroot

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Well, I must say I disagree with the entire concept of trying to "appear smart," since it is hopelessly flawed. As many people have already mentioned, people who are genuinely intelligent will see through your thin veneer rather quickly.

If your intention is to make people like you, an overly-intellectual attitude is probably going to work against you. If your intention is to lord your intellect over other people to make yourself feel better at their expense, then you probably have bigger problems than can be solved by reading a few books.

I mean no offense, bor0000, but this sounds like a pretty typical sort of adolescent differentiation. As teenagers struggle to figure out who they want to be -- and who they want to like them -- they often try on different personalities for size. Some people, like yourself, think the most effective kind of differentiation is to appear precocious or otherwise "better" than other people. While I think this approach is mostly doomed to failure, I'll provide my advice, anyway.

1) The central driving force behind intellectual grandeur is: interest. If you're not genuinely interested in something, you'll never master it. So, my advice is to figure out which subjects you find interesting -- literature, art, airplanes, science, chess, you name it -- and study them with genuine passion. When you tire of one subject, pick another one. Many people are impressed with "Renaissance (wo)men," those who can have at least a passing, competent conversation about almost any topic.

Keep in mind that esoteric topics -- like 18th century French poetry -- are unlikely to come up in most conversation. If you spend all your time becoming an expert in French poetry, it will unfortunately be lost on most people. In fact, the only way it'll even come up in conversation is if you bring it up, and that will only alienate your audience.

Instead, try to focus on basic, nuts-and-bolts kinds of topics, the sort which affect everyone and often come up in everyday conversation. Learn about how the body works, or how different medicines affect it. Learn about different kinds of foods -- where and how they're made. Learn about housing construction (how difficult would it be to rip out that old sink and put a new one in?) and automobles (is it hard to change brake shoes?). Learn about computers, the internet, and other kinds of technology.

2) Read the newspaper or a news magazine regularly. Current events have an interesting two-faced natures. On the one hand, current events are very powerful: they literally define our world as it exists in the moment. On the other hand, many people feel trepidation about trying to fully understand them.

Let's take an example. They get the feeling it would take years of research to fully understand, say, the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, so they opt of even having an opinion on it. Ask most people on the street about the conflict, and you'll hear dismissive, trivial responses like "I don't know, but I think they they should stop fighting."

If you spend some time reading (good) news media, you can gain a much deeper and significant understanding of current events. If someone brings up the Israeli conflict in a conversation, and you say "Well, I read that Israel pretty much kicked the Palestinians out of their homes back in the forties -- some of them still treasure their old house keys, years later," people will regard you as someone with wisdom. Even if all you're doing is repeating the opinions of the columnists in Time, you'll still garner your audience's respect.

3) Pay attention to your presentation. Make sure your spelling and grammar are at least decent. Try using some of those "word-a-day" websites to build your vocabulary. Do not flaunt, however. Even if you can properly build incredibly complex sentence structures, or know the meaning of unusual words like quixotic, you shouldn't use them all the time. Use the best word for the job. Reserve the big, difficult words for those times when, honestly, no other word fits as well. Speak to your audience with the sort of vocabulary and grammar that includes your audience.

4) Do your best to never offer advice who those who not made it clear they want it. Even if you see someone struggling to decide whether to take Excedrin or aspirin, don't tell them what they should do unless they ask. Since you're not a doctor, your opinion is really no more valid than their own. Any attempt to "play yourself" as a medical authority (just because you know that caffeine is a vasoconstrictor and probably would help with a migraine) will be met with contempt. Instead, wait until they ask, perhaps even absent-mindedly, which one they should take, then offer your advice in the most simple and unassuming way you can.

5) Consider the behavior of people around you whom you regard as intelligent, and emulate them. Don't try to pretend that you know everything they do, as that just takes time to develop. Instead, focus on their interpersonal skills, as that's probably want endeared you to them in the first place.

- Warren
 
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Put lots of letters after your name whenever you sign your name, like Jeff Jefferson FGi fnO CBj Obq Bsc Mnd Phi
 

selfAdjoint

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3trQN said:
Put lots of letters after your name whenever you sign your name, like Jeff Jefferson FGi fnO CBj Obq Bsc Mnd Phi
Does anybody remember Frank Baum's T. Wogglebug H.M, F.R.G.S., F.R.Z.S.? From The Land of Oz, the second, and in my opinion, best, Oz book.

(the letters mean "Highly Magnified", "Frightened by a Green Snake, Friday Zeptember Seventeenth". Wogglebug was a biological specimen that the Wizard had accidentally preserved in magnified state.
 

chroot

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I guess I just realized that most of my suggestion on "appearing" smart were really suggestions on becoming smart. Heh.

- Warren
 

jcsd

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1) Hang around stupid people.

2) Perfect a wry laugh and use it all the time to make it seem as if your seeing some hidden subtext that no-one else has seen.

3) Everytime someone says soemthing mundane like 'I had fried eggs for breakfest" say "interesting" and stroke your chin as if your pondering the philosophical meaning of the statement.

4) Constantly tell jokes with obscure classical references as if you expect everyone to fully understand these references.

5) wear glasses.
 
Mk said:
Sisyphus? :confused: You must have wireless now.
yea I've had it for a while now.

what makes you say that? :confused:
 
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Schrodinger's Dog said:
As homer says Camus can do but Sartre is smartre

i liked your quote, but i think it was jay who said that sentence.
homer said: "yeah well, Scooby Doo can doo-doo but jimmy carter is smarter". :biggrin:

anyway, warren said it all i think.
but remeber - don't show off your smarts, it makes other people feel bad/angry.

talk only about things that the other person knows about, or have a good point.
if you'd start explaining S.R. to some girl in a bar the conversation would end pretty quickly.
but if you'd insert a funny and witty remark that anyone would understand it would be fine... and don't be too artificial when inserting a remark, it's better to say nothing then to talk out of context just to show you got something to say.
 
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Write a book on how to be smart. It doesn't matter whether you actually know how to be smart or not. If you wrote a book on it, people will think you know something about it. Thus, you'll appear smart.
 

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